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Research Papers

New In Situ Imaging-Based Methodology to Identify the Material Constitutive Model Coefficients in Metal Cutting Process

[+] Author and Article Information
Xiao-Ming Zhang

State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology,
Huazhong University of Science and Technology,
Wuhan 430074, China
e-mails: cheungxm@hust.edu.cn; zhangxm.duyi@gmail.com

Ke Zhang

State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology,
Huazhong University of Science and Technology,
Wuhan 430074, China
e-mail: hustzk@hust.edu.cn

Dong Zhang

State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology,
Huazhong University of Science and Technology,
Wuhan 430074, China
e-mail: zhangdong@hust.edu.cn

Jose Outeiro

LaBoMaP Laboratory,
Arts et Metiers ParisTech,
F-71250 Cluny, France
e-mail: jose.outeiro@ensam.eu

Han Ding

State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology,
Huazhong University of Science and Technology,
Wuhan 430074, China
e-mail: cheungxm@gmail.com

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received December 27, 2018; final manuscript received July 1, 2019; published online August 1, 2019. Assoc. Editor: Radu Pavel.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 141(10), (Aug 01, 2019) (11 pages) Paper No: MANU-18-1891; doi: 10.1115/1.4044251 History: Received December 27, 2018; Accepted July 02, 2019

A great challenge of metal cutting modeling is the ability of the material constitutive model to describe the mechanical behavior of the work material under the deformation conditions that characterizes this process. In particular, metal cutting generates a large range of state of stresses, as well as strains and strain rates higher than those generated by conventional mechanical tests, including the Split-Hopkinson pressure bar tests. A new hybrid analytical–experimental methodology to identify the material constitutive model coefficients is proposed. This methodology is based on an in situ high-resolution imaging and digital image correlation (DIC) technique, coupled with an analytical model of orthogonal cutting. This methodology is particularly suitable for the identification of the constitutive model coefficients at strains and strain rates higher than those found in mechanical tests. Orthogonal cutting tests of nickel aluminum bronze alloy are performed to obtain the strains and strain rates fields in the cutting zone, using DIC technique. Shear forces derived from stress integrations are matched to the measured ones. Then, the constitutive model coefficients can be determined, which is performed by solving a sequential optimization problem. Verifications are made by comparing the strain, strain rate, and temperature fields of cutting zone from experiments against those obtained by finite element simulations using the identified material constitutive model coefficients as input.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Experimental setup

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Fig. 2

Specimen preparation: (1) precutting, (2) polishing, and (3) sand blasting

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Fig. 3

Velocity component (m/min) along X direction for the cutting conditions: (a) V = 30 m/min, h = 0.1 mm; and (b) V = 150 m/min, h = 0.15 mm

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Fig. 4

Velocity component (m/min) along Y direction for the cutting conditions: (a) V = 30 m/min, h = 0.1 mm; and (b) V = 150 m/min, h = 0.15 mm

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Fig. 5

Equivalent plastic strain rate (s−1) for cutting conditions: (a) V = 30 m/min, h = 0.1 mm; and (b) V = 150 m/min, h = 0.15 mm

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Fig. 6

Small chip (circle) sliding over the machined surface

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Fig. 7

Streamlines of the flow for cutting conditions: (a) V = 30 m/min, h = 0.1 mm; and (b) V = 150 m/min, h = 0.15 mm

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Fig. 8

Equivalent plastic strain for cutting conditions: (a) V = 30 m/min, h = 0.1 mm; and (b) V = 150 m/min, h = 0.15 mm

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Fig. 9

Flowchart of the proposed approach for identifying the constitutive constants

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Fig. 10

True stress versus true strain curve of NAB in QS compression test

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Fig. 11

Shear plane analysis: (a) force diagram and (b) determination of shear plane AB

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Fig. 12

Temperature distribution in the primary shear zones for cutting conditions: (a) V = 30 m/min, h = 0.1 mm; and (b) V = 150 m/min, h = 0.15 mm

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Fig. 13

Stresses along shear planes for cutting conditions: (a) V = 30 m/min, h = 0.1 mm; and (b) V = 150 m/min, h = 0.15 mm

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Fig. 14

Shear forces FS derived from FC and FT for cutting conditions: (a) V = 30 m/min, h = 0.1 mm; and (b) V = 150 m/min, h = 0.15 mm

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Fig. 15

Strain rate fields (s−1) from finite element simulations: (a) V = 30 m/min, h = 0.1 mm; and (b) V = 150 m/min, h = 0.15 mm

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Fig. 16

Strain fields from finite element simulations: (a) V = 30 m/min, h = 0.1 mm; and (b) V = 150 m/min, h = 0.15 mm

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Fig. 17

Temperature fields (°C) from finite element simulations: (a) V = 30 m/min, h = 0.1 mm; and (b) V = 150 m/min, h = 0.15 mm

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