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Technical Brief

Analytical Modeling of White Layer Formation in Orthogonal Cutting of AerMet100 Steel Based on Phase Transformation Mechanism

[+] Author and Article Information
Haohao Zeng

National NC System Engineering Research Center, School of Mechanical Science and Engineering,
Huazhong University of Science and Technology,
Wuhan 430074, China
e-mail: mzh2012@hust.edu.cn

Rong Yan

National NC System Engineering Research Center, School of Mechanical Science and Engineering,
Huazhong University of Science and Technology,
Wuhan 430074, China
e-mail: yanrong@hust.edu.cn

Tiantian Hu

National NC System Engineering Research Center, School of Mechanical Science and Engineering,
Huazhong University of Science and Technology,
Wuhan 430074, China
e-mail: tthu2015@163.com

Pengle Du

National NC System Engineering Research Center, School of Mechanical Science and Engineering,
Huazhong University of Science and Technology,
Wuhan 430074, China
e-mail: dupengle@163.com

Wei Wang

National NC System Engineering Research Center, School of Mechanical Science and Engineering,
Huazhong University of Science and Technology,
Wuhan 430074, China
e-mail: a846070570@163.com

Fangyu Peng

State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, School of Mechanical Science and Engineering,
Huazhong University of Science and Technology,
Wuhan 430074, China
e-mail: zwm8917@263.net

1Corresponding authors.

Manuscript received August 28, 2018; final manuscript received April 11, 2019; published online May 3, 2019. Assoc. Editor: Radu Pavel.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 141(6), 064502 (May 03, 2019) (7 pages) Paper No: MANU-18-1628; doi: 10.1115/1.4043579 History: Received August 28, 2018; Accepted April 15, 2019

The white layer formed in machining has significant impacts on the friction property, fatigue resistance, and service life of products. This paper presents an analytical model for white layer prediction in orthogonal cutting based on phase transformation mechanism. The effects of stress, elastic, and plastic strain on phase transformation temperature are taken into consideration. A function related to cutting temperature and phase transformation temperature is defined to determine the white layer thickness. The theoretical model is validated by machining AerMet100 steel under different cutting conditions. Optical microscope and X-ray diffraction (XRD) are employed to analyze the microstructures of the white layer. A phase transformation is detected in the white layer region, and the predicted white layer thicknesses are in good agreement with the measured values. In addition, the plastic strain is found to be the major factor that causes a reduction in phase transformation temperature. This work can be further applied to optimize cutting conditions to improve machined surface integrity.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Shear and plow heat sources

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Fig. 2

Movement range of the researched point for white layer prediction

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Fig. 3

Orthogonal cutting setup: (a) workpiece geometry and (b) orthogonal cutting

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Fig. 4

White layers generated in experiments: (a) No. 1, (b) No. 3, (c) No. 5, and (d) No. 6

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Fig. 5

White layers generated in experiments: (a) No. 7, (b) No. 9, (c) No. 11, and (d) No. 12

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Fig. 6

Variations of white layer thickness with (a) cutting speed and (b) uncut chip thickness

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Fig. 7

Variation histories of (a) cutting temperature and phase transformation temperature and (b) strain energy density

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Fig. 8

Diffractograms taken on specimens: (a) No. 2 and (b) No. 11

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