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Research Papers

A Study on the Influences of Abrasive Media's Viscoelasticity on Entrance Effect in Abrasive Flow Machining

[+] Author and Article Information
Haibo Wei

Key Laboratory for Precision and Non-Traditional Machining Technology of Ministry of Education,
Dalian University of Technology,
Dalian 116024, China
e-mail: haibwei@163.com

Xuanping Wang

Key Laboratory for Precision and Non-Traditional Machining Technology of Ministry of Education,
Dalian University of Technology,
Dalian 116024, China
e-mail: xpwang@dlut.edu.cn

Hang Gao

Key Laboratory for Precision and Non-Traditional Machining Technology of Ministry of Education,
Dalian University of Technology,
Dalian 116024, China
e-mail: gaohang@dlut.edu.cn

Can Peng

Key Laboratory for Precision and Non-Traditional Machining Technology of Ministry of Education,
Dalian University of Technology,
Dalian 116024, China
e-mail: 517350148@mail.dlut.edu.cn

Xuyue Wang

Key Laboratory for Precision and Non-Traditional Machining Technology of Ministry of Education,
Dalian University of Technology,
Dalian 116024, China
e-mail: wbzzd@dlut.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received September 9, 2018; final manuscript received April 1, 2019; published online April 19, 2019. Assoc. Editor: Radu Pavel.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 141(6), 061010 (Apr 19, 2019) (11 pages) Paper No: MANU-18-1647; doi: 10.1115/1.4043454 History: Received September 09, 2018; Accepted April 02, 2019

Abrasive flow machining (AFM) is a nontraditional surface finishing method that finishes complex surface by pushing the abrasive media flow through the workpiece surface. The entrance effect that the material removal increases at the entrance of changing the cross-sectional flow channel is a difficult problem for AFM. In this paper, the effects of media rheological properties on the entrance effect are discussed. To explore the effects of the media's viscoelasticity on the entrance effect, two sets of media with different viscoelasticity properties are adopted to study their rheological and machining performances in the designed flow channel with a contraction area. The rheological properties are tested by frequency sweep and characterized by the Maxwell viscoelastic model and the Carreau viscous model. In the experiment, the variation of the profile height (ΔH) and the variation ratio of the roughness (ΔRa) on the workpiece surface are measured. Moreover, numerical simulation results under different constitutive equations are compared with the experimental results. It shows that the numerical simulation results of a viscoelastic model have a better agreement with the experimental results than the viscous model, and the increase of the viscoelasticity makes the entrance effect be exacerbated, which can be predicted by the viscoelastic numerical simulation.

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Design of fixture and flow channel

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Fig. 3

Schematic diagram of abrasive media's compression deformation and extrusion swell in the AFM process

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Fig. 2

Deformation of viscous and viscoelastic media by the action of normal stress

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Fig. 1

Schematic diagram of the AFM process

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Fig. 7

Frequency sweep results of two media: (a) complex viscosity, (b) storage modulus, and (c) loss modulus

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Fig. 8

Geometric model for flow channel in numerical simulation

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Fig. 5

Measurement and calculation of profile height variation (ΔH)

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Fig. 6

Positions of the three measured points on the workpiece surface

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Fig. 9

Results of flow velocity and pressure by numerical simulation with the Maxwell viscoelastic constitutive equation: (a) velocity contour, (b) distribution of velocity on the wall of the contraction area, (c) pressure contour, and (d) distribution of pressure on the wall of the contraction area

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Fig. 15

Schematic diagram of the effects of the media's flow direction on the movement of grains

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Fig. 16

Variations of the surface roughness at three points in two experiments: (a) experiment 1 (exp.1) and (b) experiment 2 (exp.2)

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Fig. 17

Comparison of the microscopic image by SEM before and after AFM of point 1: (a) before AFM and (b) after AFM

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Fig. 18

Comparison of the microscopic image by SEM before and after AFM of point 2: (a) before AFM and (b) after AFM

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Fig. 10

Results of flow velocity and pressure by numerical simulation with the Carreau viscous constitutive equation: (a) velocity contour, (b) distribution of velocity on the wall of the contraction area, (c) pressure contour, and (d) distribution of pressure on the wall of the contraction area

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Fig. 11

Profiles of the workpiece surface before and after the AFM process: (a) profile in experiment 1 (exp.1) and (b) profile in experiment 2 (exp.2)

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Fig. 12

Numerical results of flow velocity and pressure on the wall of the contraction area for two experiments: (a) distribution of the velocity and (b) distribution of the pressure

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Fig. 13

Comparison of profile height variation in two experiments and the numerical results: (a) variation of profile height (ΔH) in two experiments and (b) viscoelastic simulation results for two experiments

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Fig. 14

Flow velocity vectors at inlet and outlet of the contraction area by the viscoelastic numerical simulation: (a) velocity vector at the inlet and (b) velocity vector at the outlet

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