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Research Papers

Joint Formation and Mechanical Performance of Friction Self-Piercing Riveted Aluminum Alloy AA7075-T6 Joints

[+] Author and Article Information
Yun Wu Ma

Shanghai Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacture for Thin-Walled Structures,
State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, PR China
e-mail: myw3337@sjtu.edu.cn

Yong Bing Li

Shanghai Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacture for Thin-Walled Structures,
State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, PR China
e-mail: yongbinglee@sjtu.edu.cn

Zhong Qin Lin

Shanghai Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacture for Thin-Walled Structures,
State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, PR China
e-mail: zqlin@sjtu.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received April 3, 2018; final manuscript received December 23, 2018; published online February 27, 2019. Assoc. Editor: Gracious Ngaile.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 141(4), 041005 (Feb 27, 2019) (11 pages) Paper No: MANU-18-1202; doi: 10.1115/1.4042568 History: Received April 03, 2018; Accepted December 23, 2018

AA7xxx series aluminum alloys have great potentials in mass saving of vehicle bodies due to pretty high specific strength. However, the use of these high strength materials poses significant challenges to the traditional self-piercing riveting (SPR) process. To address this issue, a novel process, friction self-piercing riveting (F-SPR), was applied to join aluminum alloy AA7075-T6 sheets. The effects of the spindle speed and rivet feed rate on F-SPR joint cross section geometry evolution, riveting force, and energy input were investigated systematically. It was found that the rivet shank deformation, especially the buckling of the shank tip before penetrating through the top sheet, has significant influence on geometry and lap shear failure mode of the final joint. A medium rivet feed rate combined with a high spindle speed was prone to produce a defect-free joint with sound mechanical interlocking. F-SPR joints with the failure mode of rivet shear fracture were observed to have superior lap shear peak load and energy absorption over the joints with mechanical interlock failure. The optimized F-SPR joint in this study exhibited 67.6% and 13.9% greater lap shear peak load compared with SPR and refill friction stir spot welding joints, respectively, of the same sheets. This research provides a valuable reference for further understanding the F-SPR process.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of the friction self-piercing riveting process: (a) starting, (b) penetrating, (c) softening and deformation, (d) quick stop, and (e) releasing

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Fig. 2

Dimensions of the F-SPR rivet and the die: (a) rivet and (b) die. The unit is mm.

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Fig. 3

F-SPR system: (a) twin servo-driven, C-frame equipment, (b) a close-up view of the F-SPR platform, and (c) a close-up view of the rivet and the die

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Fig. 4

Comparison of shank flaring under different F-SPR process parameter combinations

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Fig. 5

Analysis of force and torque at the beginning of rivet’s piercing the top sheet in F-SPR process

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Fig. 6

Evolution of F-SPR joint cross section profiles under different process parameter combinations obtained through interrupting the process at the plunge depth of 1.0 mm, 2.0 mm, 3.0 mm, and 4.0 mm. (a1)–(a5) 3600-2.0, (b1)–(b5) 3600-5.0, (c1)–(c5) 3600-11, and (d1)–(d5) 1200-2.0.

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Fig. 7

Evolution of the shank flaring value with the increase of plunge depth

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Fig. 8

Schematic of the F-SPR joint formation process and joint quality classifications under different process parameter combinations

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Fig. 9

Typical force-displacement curves during the F-SPR process with a spindle speed of 3600 rpm and a feed rate of 2.0 mm/s. Three repetitions are shown.

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Fig. 10

Force-displacement curves during F-SPR: (a) curves under the same feed rate of 2.0 mm/s but different spindle speeds and (b) curves under the same spindle speed of 3600 rpm but different feed rates

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Fig. 11

Force values of the F-SPR process under different process parameter combinations: (a) first peak value and (b) final peak value

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Fig. 12

Energy input analysis of the F-SPR process: (a) energy ratio and (b) total energy input

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Fig. 13

Summary of the lap shear strength of the F-SPR joints under different process parameter combinations in comparison with the peak loads of the SPR joint and the RFSSW joint. The data of RFSSW are from Ref. [11].

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Fig. 14

A typical SPR joint of AA7075-T6 to itself made with Henrob rivet C50544AY04/HAQ at a setting speed of 320 mm/s: (a) joint cross sectioned through the centerline and (b) a bottom view of the joint (die side)

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Fig. 15

Lap shear failure modes of the F-SPR joints: (a) rivet failure of the defect-free joint 3000-2.0; (b) mechanical interlock failure of the defect-free joint 3600-2.0; and (c) mechanical interlock failure of the QI joint 3000-11

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Fig. 16

Lap shear load-displacement curves of F-SPR joints with different failure modes. Three repetitions of each condition are shown.

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