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Research Papers

Forming Mechanism of Asymmetric Cylinder With Oblique–Straight Flange Spinning

[+] Author and Article Information
Z. Jia

Key Laboratory of Fundamental Science for National Defense of Aeronautical Digital Manufacturing Process,
Shenyang Aerospace University,
Shenyang 110136, China
e-mail: jiaz_2006@sina.com

Z. R. Han

Key Laboratory of Fundamental Science for National Defense of Aeronautical Digital Manufacturing Process,
Shenyang Aerospace University,
Shenyang 110136, China
e-mail: hanren888@163.com

Y. Xiao

Key Laboratory of Fundamental Science for National Defense of Aeronautical Digital Manufacturing Process,
Shenyang Aerospace University,
Shenyang 110136, China;
School of Mechanical Engineering,
Northwestern Polytechnical University,
Xian 710072, China
e-mail: 525287383@163.com

S. D. Ji

Key Laboratory of Fundamental Science for National Defense of Aeronautical Digital Manufacturing Process,
Shenyang Aerospace University,
Shenyang 110136, China
e-mail: superjsd@163.com

B. Xu

Institute of Metal Research,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Shenyang 110016, China
e-mail: bxu@imr.ac.cn

1Corresponding authors.

Manuscript received July 9, 2018; final manuscript received April 11, 2019; published online May 3, 2019. Assoc. Editor: Yannis Korkolis.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 141(6), 061012 (May 03, 2019) (10 pages) Paper No: MANU-18-1517; doi: 10.1115/1.4043535 History: Received July 09, 2018; Accepted April 15, 2019

The asymmetric cylinder with oblique–straight flange spinning has the potential to become a production process for this shape of the aerospace part. This complex shaped part was attempted to be formed by synchronous multipass spinning from a blank disk of 6061-O aluminum alloy with 1.15-mm thickness. The working principle of synchronous multipass spinning focuses on the fact that the radial and axial positions of the roller are synchronized with the spindle rotation to form the roller path. The roller path was calculated by dispersing a pass set into numerous points. The dimensional space between two points from the corresponding curves in a single-pass set was integrated into the trajectory around the circumference. Here, a pass set is the path along which the roller propagates in the two-dimensional space defined by the radial and axial directions. This shape was confirmed to be spun, and the formation mechanism of this spinning process was investigated. Contrastive experiments with paired arcs and pairs of straight lines as roller paths were performed on a spinning machine. The working condition of the cylinder wall with pairs of straight lines roller path was broken because of the higher pull resistance from the remaining part of the flange. The working condition of the flange of the paired arcs follows the law of shear spinning approximately that the cylinder wall forming does not comply. Suitable metal distributions for the flange and an appropriate force state for the cylinder wall are realized by the paired arcs roller path in the spinning process to form the asymmetric cylinder with oblique–straight flange. This provides a theoretical basis for the spinning of the asymmetric cylinder with the oblique–straight flange.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Oblique–straight flange tubular part

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Fig. 2

Illustration of the geometric dimensions in the (a) blank disk, (b) side view, and (c) top view of the workpiece

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Fig. 3

Multipass draw spinning roller path for the oblique–straight flange: (a) top and (b) side view of the pair of arcs roller path schematic, (c) partial enlargement of one PA path, (d) top view, and (e) side view of the pair of straight line roller path schematic

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Fig. 4

Roller path of a single PA: (a) top view and (b) stereoscopic view

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Fig. 5

Spinning equipment and tooling

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Fig. 6

Tensile stress–strain relation of the blank material

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Fig. 7

Spun workpieces with the (a) PA and (b) PSL roller paths and β = 80 deg

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Fig. 8

Spun workpieces with β = 78 deg, 75 deg, 72 deg, and 69 deg: (a) top view and (b) side view

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Fig. 9

Comparison of the theoretical and measured value of the cylinder wall height with β = 80 deg, β = 78 deg, β = 75 deg, β = 72 deg, and β = 69 deg

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Fig. 10

Wall thickness of the asymmetric cylinder with the (a) PSL and (b) PA roller path

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Fig. 11

Wall thickness of the asymmetric cylinder with (a) β = 80 deg, (b) β = 78 deg, (c) β = 75 deg, (d) β = 72 deg, and (e) β = 69 deg

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Fig. 12

Schematic of the three-dimensional stress–strain status in the spinning process: (a) on the flange and (b) on the cylinder wall

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Fig. 13

PA multipass spinning process: (a) blank disk, (b) 3 passes, (c) 9 passes, and (d) 17 passes

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Fig. 14

Wall thickness distribution of the asymmetric cylinder after nine passes

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Fig. 15

Flange thickness distribution in the workpiece with the PSL roller path

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Fig. 16

Flange thickness distributions of the workpieces with the PA roller path after (a) 3 passes, (b) 9 passes, and (c) 17 passes

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