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Technical Brief

Constructing Process Models of Engine Blade Surfaces for Their Adaptive Machining: An Optimal Approach

[+] Author and Article Information
Neng Wan

The Key Laboratory of Contemporary Design and
Integrated Manufacturing Technology of Ministry
of Education,
Northwestern Polytechnical University,
Xi'an 710072, Shanxi, China
e-mail: wanneng@nwpu.edu.cn

Peng Liu

The Key Laboratory of Contemporary Design and
Integrated Manufacturing Technology of Ministry
of Education,
Northwestern Polytechnical University,
Xi'an 710072, Shanxi, China
e-mail: 694960867@qq.com

Zezhong C. Chen

Industrial and Aerospace Engineering, Department of
Mechanical, Concordia University,
Montreal, QC H3G 1M8, Canada
e-mail: zcchen@encs.concordia.ca

Zhiyong Chang

The Key Laboratory of Contemporary Design and
Integrated Manufacturing Technology of Ministry
of Education,
Northwestern Polytechnical University,
Xi'an 710072, Shanxi, China
e-mail: changzy@nwpu.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received May 23, 2018; final manuscript received September 30, 2018; published online October 19, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Tugrul Ozel.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 141(1), 014501 (Oct 19, 2018) (10 pages) Paper No: MANU-18-1356; doi: 10.1115/1.4041625 History: Received May 23, 2018; Revised September 30, 2018

In a new blade manufacturing process, manufacturers precisely forge blade billets with the blade suction and the pressure surfaces within tolerance. After that, only two blade edge billets should be machined to the leading- and the trailing-edges within tolerance. If these edge design surfaces are used to generate tool paths for machining the edge billets, the machined edges are not continuous with the suction and the pressure surfaces. To address this problem, an optimal approach to constructing process models of edge surfaces is proposed for adaptive blade machining. Specifically, the modified edge surfaces are optimized within the design tolerance and are continuous with the billet suction and pressure surfaces. These surfaces are used to generate tool paths for machining the edge billets. This approach addresses the current technical challenge in the new blade manufacturing process and can substantially promote this process in blade mass production.

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References

Song, Y. , and Gu, C. W. , 2013, “ Continuous Curvature Leading Edge of Compressor Blading,” J. Propul. Technol., 34(11), pp. 1474–1480.
Liu, B. J. , Yuan, C. X. , and Yu, X. J. , 2013, “ Effects of Leading-Edge Geometry on Aerodynamic Performance in Controlled Diffusion Airfoil,” J. Propul. Technol., 34(7), pp. 890–897.
Wang, J. , Wang, Z. G. , Zhu, W. D. , and Ji, Y. F. , 2010, “ Recognition of Freeform Surface Machining Features,” ASME J. Comput. Inf. Sci. Eng., 10(4), p. 041006. [CrossRef]
Sheen, B. T. , and You, C. F. , 2006, “ Machining Feature Recognition and Tool-Path Generation for 3-Axis CNC Milling,” Comput. Aided Des., 38(6), pp. 553–562. [CrossRef]
Sun, Y. W. , Xu, J. T. , Guo, D. M. , and Jia, Z. Y. , 2009, “ A Unified Localization Approach for Machining Allowance Optimization of Complex Curved Surfaces,” Precis. Eng., 33(4), pp. 516–523. [CrossRef]
Mehrad, V. , Xue, D. , and Gu, P. , 2014, “ Robust Localization to Align Measured Points on the Manufactured Surface With Design Surface for Freeform Surface Inspection,” Comput. Aided Des., 53, pp. 90–103. [CrossRef]
Wu, B. H. , Wang, J. , Zhang, Y. , and Luo, M. , 2015, “ Adaptive Location of Repaired Blade for Multi-Axis Milling,” J. Comput. Des. Eng., 2(4), pp. 261–267.

Figures

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Fig. 1

A compressor blade with a suction, a pressure, and a leading- and a trailing-edge surface

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Fig. 9

A modified leading-edge surface is designed and is used to generate tool paths for machining the leading-edge billet

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Fig. 8

According to a billet edge surface, different modified edge curves can be generated

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Fig. 7

The design principles of a modified leading-edge surface

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Fig. 6

The profiles of the leading and the trailing edges of the billet

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Fig. 5

The strategy of measuring the billet edges

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Fig. 4

(a) Six profiles discretely represent the blade and (b) the blade profiles are in red and the tolerance boundaries in green

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Fig. 3

(a) A blade design with the suction, pressure, leading- and trailing-edge surfaces and (b) profiles of these design surfaces on a plane

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Fig. 2

(a) A blade with a qualified suction and a pressure surface and (b) unsmooth adjoining areas between the suction surface and the leading-edge surface

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Fig. 10

Illustration of condition 1

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Fig. 11

Illustration of condition 2

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Fig. 17

The design of a compressor blade

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Fig. 18

A billet of the compressor blade

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Fig. 16

Illustrate of constraint 3

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Fig. 12

Illustration of condition 3

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Fig. 13

Illustration of the objective function

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Fig. 14

Illustration of constraint 1

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Fig. 15

Illustration of constraint 2

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Fig. 19

The billet is measured on a CNC machine tool

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Fig. 20

The ledge-edge billet profiles on planes 1 and 25

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Fig. 21

The optimized modified leading-edge curves

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Fig. 22

Verification of curvature continuity of the modified leading-edge curves on planes 1 and 25

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Fig. 23

The modified leading-edge surface

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Fig. 24

The billet edge is cut on a five-axis CNC machine tool

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Fig. 25

(a) The blade cut with the modified edge surface and (b) the blade cut with the design surface

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Fig. 26

The measured result of a blade cut with the modified edge surface

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Fig. 27

The measured result of a blade cut with the design surface

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Fig. 28

The two blades are measured on Alicona micro measurement machine

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Fig. 29

(a) The profile of the blade cut with the conventional method and (b) the profile of the blade cut with the new approach

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