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research-article

An adaptive geometry transformation and repair method for hybrid manufacturing

[+] Author and Article Information
Maxwell Praniewicz

George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology 801 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, Georgia 30332
max.praniewicz@gatech.edu

Thomas Kurfess

George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 801 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, Georgia 30332
kurfess@gatech.edu

Christopher Saldana

George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 801 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, Georgia 30332
christopher.saldana@me.gatech.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4041570 History: Received May 14, 2018; Revised September 20, 2018

Abstract

Hybrid manufacturing has become attractive for refurbishing of high-value freeform components. Components may experience unique geometric distortions and/or wear-driven material loss in service, which require the use of part-specific, adaptive repair strategies. This work presents an integrated adaptive geometry transformation method for additive/subtractive hybrid manufacturing based on rigid and non-rigid registrations of parent region material and geometric interpolation of repair region material. In this approach, rigid registration of nominal part geometry to actual part geometry is accomplished using iterative alignment of profiles in the parent material. Non-rigid registration is used to morph nominal part geometry to actual part geometry by transformation of the profile mean line. Adaptive additive and subtractive toolpaths are then used to add material based on constant stock margin requirements and produce blend repairs with smooth transition between parent and repair regions. A range of part deformation conditions due to profile twist and length changes were evaluated for the case of a compressor airfoil geometry. Accuracy of the adaptive geometry transformation method was quantified by surface comparisons of actual and transformed nominal geometry and blend region surface accuracy. Performance of the adaptive repair strategy relative to a naïve strategy was evaluated by consideration of material efficiency and process cycle time. It is shown that the adaptive repair strategy resulted in an increase in material efficiency by 42.2% and a decrease in process time by 17.8%, this depending on the initial deformation imposed on the part geometry.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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