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Technology Review

Additive Manufacturing for Health: State of the Art, Gaps and Needs, and Recommendations

[+] Author and Article Information
Yong Huang

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611; Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611; Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556
yongh@ufl.edu

Steven Schmid

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556
Steven.R.Schmid.2@nd.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4040430 History: Received February 28, 2018; Revised May 22, 2018

Abstract

Additive manufacturing (AM) involves using computer-controlled machines to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) structural and functional parts layer by layer. To date, ample AM application opportunities exist in the health field. Based on the outcomes at the 2016 National Science Foundation AM for Health workshop, this paper summarizes the current state, gaps and research needs, and recommendations related to AM for health, in particular, medical product and hard structure printing and bioprinting. Manufacturing-related knowledge gaps and needs mainly fall into the materials, design, process innovation, part characterization, and policy and education categories. While medical products and hard structures rarely incorporate living cells, they can be designed to integrate with tissues, and their gaps and needs are typically related to the material-process-property-functionality relationship. Bioprinting-specific gaps and needs include build material selection and construct design, printed construct preservation, process selection, scalability and modeling, bioprinting-induced cell injury management, post-printing tissue fusion and maturation, and printed construct evaluation. Research recommendations encompass aspects ranging from fundamental research support to development of suitable standards for clinical use of AM products and are summarized in terms of materials, design, process innovation, modeling, characterization, and policy and education. Medical product and hard structure-specific recommendations are mainly related to build materials and structure design. For bioprinting, recommendations are summarized based on preparation, bioprinting process, and post-bioprinting treatment. Furthermore, a biomedical manufacturing landscape is proposed; the potential of bioprinting as transformative research is introduced, and manufacturing-related scientific challenges are listed.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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