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Research Papers

Research on the Size Effect of Specific Cutting Energy Based on Numerical Simulation of Single Grit Scratching

[+] Author and Article Information
Tao Zhang, Xipeng Xu

Institute of Manufacturing Engineering,
Huaqiao University,
Xiamen 361021, China;
Engineering Research Center for Brittle
Material Intelligent Manufacturing Technology,
Fujian Province,
Xiamen 361021, China

Feng Jiang

Institute of Manufacturing Engineering,
Huaqiao University,
Xiamen 361021, China;
Engineering Research Center for Brittle
Material Intelligent Manufacturing Technology,
Fujian Province,
Xiamen 361021, China
e-mail: jiangfeng@hqu.edu.cn

Lan Yan

College of Mechanical
Engineering and Automation,
Huaqiao University,
Xiamen 361021, China;
Engineering Research Center for Brittle
Material Intelligent Manufacturing Technology,
Fujian Province,
Xiamen 361021, China

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received March 31, 2017; final manuscript received April 3, 2018; published online May 21, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Kai Cheng.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 140(7), 071017 (May 21, 2018) (9 pages) Paper No: MANU-17-1198; doi: 10.1115/1.4039916 History: Received March 31, 2017; Revised April 03, 2018

A method of research on the size effect of the specific cutting energy based on the numerical simulation has been proposed. The theoretical model of the research on size effect of specific cutting energy using single grit scratching simulation has been presented. A series of single grit scratch simulations with different scratching depths have been carried out to acquire different material removal rates. Then, the specific cutting energy has been calculated based on the power consumed and the material removal rate. The relationship between the specific cutting energy and the material removal rate has been given which agrees well with that presented by Malkin. The simulation results have been analyzed further to explain the size effect of specific cutting energy.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

The working condition of a single grit [3]

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Fig. 2

The procedure of numerical calculation

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Fig. 3

Comparison of simulation and test results: (a) cutting force and (b) thrust force

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Fig. 4

The thermal conductivity and heat capacity Fe–Cr–Ni stainless steel

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Fig. 5

The geometrical model

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Fig. 6

Scratch morphology and temperature distribution (scratching depth = 40 μm)

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Fig. 7

The comparison of segmental chip: (a) the segmental chip acquired by simulation (scratching depth = 5 μm) and (b) the segmental chip presented by Malkin (scanning electron microscope) [3]

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Fig. 8

Cross sections of scratches under different scratching depth: (a) scratching depth = 5 μm; (b) scratching depth = 6 μm; (c) scratching depth = 8 μm; (d) scratching depth = 12 μm; (e) scratching depth = 16 μm; (f) scratching depth = 32 μm; (g) scratching depth = 40 μm; (h) scratching depth = 52 μm; and (i) scratching depth = 64 μm

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Fig. 9

Forces and power consumed by the scratching process (scratching depth = 40 μm)

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Fig. 10

Specific cutting energy versus material removal rate

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Fig. 11

Specific cutting energy versus material removal rate presented by Malkin [3]

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Fig. 12

The simulation results of strain rate (scratching velocity = 30 m/s): (a) scratching depth = 6 μm; (b) scratching depth = 8 μm; (c) scratching depth = 12 μm; (d) scratching depth = 16 μm; (e) scratching depth = 32 μm; (f) and scratching depth = 40 μm

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Fig. 13

The simulation results of plastic strain (sScratching velocity = 30 m/s): (a) scratching depth = 6 μm; (b) scratching depth = 8 μm; (c) scratching depth = 12 μm; (d) scratching depth = 16 μm; (e) scratching depth = 32 μm; and (f) scratching depth = 40 μm

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Fig. 14

The simulation results of temperature (scratching velocity = 30 m/s): (a) scratching depth = 6 μm; (b) scratching depth = 8 μm; (c) scratching depth = 12 μm; (d) scratching depth = 16 μm; (e) scratching depth = 32 μm; and (f) scratching depth = 40 μm

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Fig. 15

Cross section profile of scratch

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Fig. 16

Pile-up ratio versus scratching depth

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