0
research-article

Effect of Friction Stir Blind Riveting Process Parameters on Joint Formation and Mechanical Performance in & of Aluminum Alloys

[+] Author and Article Information
Yunwu Ma

State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration, School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, P.R. China; Shanghai Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacture for Thin-walled Structures, School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, P.R. China
myw3337@sjtu.edu.cn

YongBing Li

State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration, School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, P.R. China; Shanghai Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacture for Thin-walled Structures, School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, P.R. China
yongbinglee@sjtu.edu.cn

Blair E. Carlson

Manufacturing Systems Research Lab, General Motors Global R&D, 30500 Mound Road, Warren, MI 48090, USA
blair.carlson@gm.com

Zhongqin Lin

State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration, School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, P.R. China; Shanghai Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacture for Thin-walled Structures, School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, P.R. China
zqlin@sjtu.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4039118 History: Received August 06, 2017; Revised January 15, 2018

Abstract

Aluminum alloys have been increasingly adopted in the fabrication of automotive body structures as an integral component of mass savings strategy. However, mixed use of dissimilar aluminum alloys, such as sheet metals, castings and extrusions poses significant challenges to the existing joining technologies, especially in regards to single-sided joint access. To address this issue, the current study applied the friction stir blind riveting (FSBR) process to join 1.2 mm-thick AA6022-T4 aluminum alloy to 3 mm-thick Aural-2 cast aluminum. A newly developed, robot mounted, servo-driven, FSBR equipment and the procedure using it to make FSBR joints were introduced systematically. The effect of rivet feed rate and spindle speed on joint formation and cross-section geometry were investigated, and it was found that a high spindle speed and low rivet feed rate, i.e., high heat input, is prone to produce good joints, and that low heat input can cause severe problems related to insufficient softening of the sheets. The rivet deformation, especially the notch location on the mandrel relative to the shank have significant influence on lap-shear strength and fracture mode of the final joints. A rivet pull-out fracture mode was observed at higher rivet feed rates and lower spindle speeds and exhibited significantly improved energy absorption capability, i.e. 62% higher compared to traditional joints.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In