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research-article

On the Simulation Scalability of Predicting Residual Stress and Distortion in Selective Laser Melting

[+] Author and Article Information
Chao Li

Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487, USA
cli60@crimson.ua.edu

Z.Y. Liu

Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487, USA
sddxzsb@gmail.com

X.Y. Fang

Institute for Advanced Manufacturing, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo 255049, China
fxy@sdut.edu.cn

Y.B. Guo

Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487, USA
yguo@eng.ua.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4038893 History: Received July 21, 2017; Revised December 12, 2017

Abstract

Rapid heating and cooling thermal cycle of metals in selective laser melting (SLM) generates high tensile residual stress which leads to part distortion. However, how to fast and accurately predict residual stress and the resulted part distortion remains a critical issue. It is not practical to simulate every single laser scan to build up a functional part due to the exceedingly high computational cost. Therefore, scaling-up the material deposition rate via increasing heat source dimension and layer thickness would dramatically reduce the computational cost. In this study, a multiscale scalable modeling approach has been developed to enable fast prediction of part distortion and residual stress. Case studies on residual stress and distortion of the L-shaped bar and the bridge structure were presented via the deposition scalability and validation with the experimental data. The influence of laser scanning strategy on residual stress distribution and distortion magnitude of the bridges was also investigated.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
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