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Research Papers

Study of Film Formation on Grooved Tools in an Atomization-Based Cutting Fluid Delivery System for Titanium Machining

[+] Author and Article Information
Devashish R. Kulkarni, Soham S. Mujumdar

Department of Mechanical Science
and Engineering,
University of Illinois,
Urbana, IL 61801

Shiv G. Kapoor

Professor
Department of Mechanical Science
and Engineering,
University of Illinois,
Urbana, IL 61801
e-mail: sgkapoor@illinois.edu

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received June 28, 2017; final manuscript received December 6, 2017; published online February 12, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Radu Pavel.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 140(4), 041007 (Feb 12, 2018) (11 pages) Paper No: MANU-17-1398; doi: 10.1115/1.4038892 History: Received June 28, 2017; Revised December 06, 2017

The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of cutting tool surface geometry and the atomization-based cutting fluid (ACF) spray parameters on the characteristics of the thin film formed in an ACF delivery system. A computational model is developed using three submodels that are used to predict the carrier gas flow, droplet trajectories and the film formation, respectively. The model is validated through film thickness measurements using a laser displacement sensor. Turning inserts with chip-breaking grooves along with a conventional flat insert are used to study the effect of cutting tool surface geometry on the model-predicted film characteristics, including film thickness and velocity. Machining experiments are also conducted to investigate the effect of film characteristics on the machining performance in terms of tool wear, which show that the tool wear is minimum at a certain desired film thickness value and large film velocity value. Carrier gas pressure and cutting fluid flow rate are also varied to study the effect of ACF spray parameters on the film characteristics. Increase in the fluid flow results in increase in both film thickness and velocity, while an increase in the gas pressure results in the reduction of the film thickness but an increase in the film velocity.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of the ACF system in a turning setup showing ACF spray parameters, i.e., fluid flow rate, gas pressure, spray distance, and spray angle

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Fig. 2

Schematic of the ACF film formation modeling approach

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Fig. 3

Computational domain used to evaluate the film formation model

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Fig. 4

Schematic of the experimental setup for ACF film thickness measurement using a laser displacement sensor

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Fig. 5

A schematic showing locations of experimental film thickness measurement points

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Fig. 6

Comparison of the simulated film thickness values with measurements for S-1001 (X is the distance from the impingement point along the centerline of the tool and Y is the perpendicular offset distance from the centerline of the insert)

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Fig. 7

Comparison of the simulated film thickness values with measurements for DI water (X is the distance from the impingement point along the centerline of the tool and Y is the perpendicular offset distance from the centerline of the insert)

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Fig. 8

Grooved turning inserts with chip-breaker geometries: (a) grooved insert 1 and (b) grooved insert 2

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Fig. 9

Film thickness contour comparison between the flat and the grooved inserts (gas pressure = 15 psi, fluid flow rate = 15 mL/min, spray distance = 30 mm, and spray angle = 30 deg)

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Fig. 10

Film velocity contour comparison between the flat and the grooved inserts (gas pressure = 15 psi, fluid flow rate = 15 mL/min, spray distance = 30 mm, and spray angle = 30 deg)

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Fig. 11

Model prediction of the effect of ACF spray parameters, i.e., fluid flow rate and the gas pressure on the area-averaged film thickness for various tool geometries: (a) flat insert, (b) grooved insert 1, and (c) grooved insert 2

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Fig. 12

Model prediction of the effect of ACF spray parameters, i.e., fluid flow rate and the gas pressure on the area-averaged film velocity for various tool geometries: (a) flat insert, (b) grooved insert 1, and (c) grooved insert 2

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Fig. 13

Velocity gradients in the liquid film

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Fig. 14

Setup for turning experiments

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Fig. 15

Tool flank wear in dry cutting: (a) flank wear—flat insert, (b) flank wear—grooved insert 1, and (c): flank wear—grooved insert 2

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Fig. 16

Normalized tool wear as a function of film thickness and film velocity

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