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Review Article

Hybrid Processes in Additive Manufacturing

[+] Author and Article Information
Michael P. Sealy

Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, W342 Nebraska Hall, Lincoln, NE, USA 68588-0526
sealy@unl.edu

Gurucharan Madireddy

Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, W342 Nebraska Hall, Lincoln, NE, USA 68588-0526
gmadireddy2@huskers.unl.edu

Robert Williams

Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, W342 Nebraska Hall, Lincoln, NE, USA 68588-0526
rwilliams2@unl.edu

Prahalad Rao

Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, W342 Nebraska Hall, Lincoln, NE, USA 68588-0526
rao@unl.edu

Maziar Toursangsaraki

School of Mechanical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran, Iran 16846-13114
maziar.tour@gmail.com

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4038644 History: Received July 12, 2017; Revised November 26, 2017

Abstract

Hybrid additive manufacturing (hybrid-AM) has described hybrid processes and machines as well as multi-material, multi-structural, and multi-functional printing. The capabilities afforded by hybrid-AM are rewriting the design rules for materials and adding a new dimension in the design for additive manufacturing paradigm. This work primarily focuses on defining hybrid-AM in relation to hybrid manufacturing and classifying hybrid-AM processes. Hybrid-AM machines, materials, structures, and function are also discussed. Hybrid-AM processes are defined as the use of additive manufacturing (AM) with one or more secondary processes or energy sources that are fully coupled and synergistically affect part quality, functionality, and/or process performance. Historically, defining hybrid manufacturing processes centered on process improvement rather than improvements to part quality or performance; however, the primary goal for the majority of hybrid-AM processes is to improve part quality and performance. Hybrid-AM processes are distinguished from post-processing operations that do not meet the fully coupled criterion. Secondary processes and energy sources include subtractive and transformative manufacturing technologies, such as machining, re-melting, peening, rolling, and friction stir processing. As the demand for hybrid-AM increases, new economic and sustainability tools are needed as well as sensing technologies that can play a critical role in defect detection and part and processes characterization. Hybrid-AM has ushered in the next evolutionary step in additive manufacturing and has the potential to profoundly change the way goods are manufactured.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
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