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Research Papers

Dynamics of Multipoint Thread Turning—Part II: Application to Thin-Walled Oil Pipes

[+] Author and Article Information
Mohammad R. Khoshdarregi

Mem. ASME
Intelligent Digital Manufacturing
Laboratory (IDML),
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Manitoba,
Winnipeg, MB R3T 5V6, Canada
e-mail: M.Khoshdarregi@umanitoba.ca

Yusuf Altintas

Professor
Fellow ASME
Manufacturing Automation Laboratory (MAL),
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of British Columbia,
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
e-mail: altintas@mech.ubc.ca

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received June 28, 2017; final manuscript received November 18, 2017; published online February 14, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Satish Bukkapatnam.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 140(4), 041016 (Feb 14, 2018) (11 pages) Paper No: MANU-17-1400; doi: 10.1115/1.4038573 History: Received June 28, 2017; Revised November 18, 2017

This paper extends the general threading model developed in Part I to the case of thin-walled workpieces. Structural behavior of a cylindrical shell is dominated by the low-damped flexural modes. Due to the circumferential patterns of the shell modes, the cutting forces result in different instantaneous displacements around the circumference of the workpiece. The residual shell vibrations can affect the chip thickness when the corresponding point arrives at the cutting region. In this paper, the workpiece surface is discretized, and the instantaneous shell deformations due to the cutting forces are evaluated. The dynamic equation of motion for threading thin-walled workpieces is derived, and the stability and surface location errors are analyzed. The proposed threading model is validated experimentally on real-scale oil pipes for different pass numbers and infeed values. Sample approaches for chatter suppression are demonstrated experimentally.

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References

API, 2008, “Specification for Threading, Gauging and Thread Inspection of Casing, Tubing, and Line Pipe Threads,” American Petroleum Institute, Washington, DC, Standard No. 5B-96. https://global.ihs.com/doc_detail.cfm%3Fdocument_name%3DAPI%2520SPEC%25205B
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Figures

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Fig. 1

Sample thread profiles used in the oil and gas industry: (a) API buttress and (b) V-profile

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Fig. 2

Vibration modes of a clamped thin-walled workpiece: (a) beam modes, (b) axial shell patterns, and (c) circumferential shell patterns

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Fig. 3

Response of cylindrical shells to machining loads: (a) chip thickness variation due to the vibrations and (b) instantaneous displacement at each point around the circumference

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Fig. 5

A sample three-point V-profile insert used for the simulations

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Fig. 4

Roundness error of the workpiece: (a) elliptical modeling of the error and (b) resultant infeed variation over one spindle revolution

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Fig. 8

Circumferential mode shape analysis at the tip: (a) measurement points, (b) radial FRFs, (c) and (d) magnitude and imaginary components of the FRFs at the dominant mode, and (e) and (f) circumferential pattern of the dominant mode

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Fig. 9

Measured FRFs at the tip of the pipe before each threading set

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Fig. 10

Experimental results for set 1 (120 rpm, infeed: 0.020 in (0.508 mm)/pass, insert: Ceratizit five-point buttress): (a) stability charts and the experiment point (star), (b) and (c) recorded sound signal and its frequency contents, and (d) surface finish

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Fig. 11

Experimental results for set 2 (120 rpm, infeed: 0.020 in (0.508 mm)/pass, insert: Ceratizit five-point buttress): (a) stability charts and the experiment point (star), (b) and (c) recorded sound signal and its frequency contents, and (d) surface finish

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Fig. 12

Experimental results for set 3 (120 rpm, infeed: 0.020 in (0.508 mm)/pass, insert: Ceratizit five-point buttress): (a) stability charts and the experiment point (star), (b) and (c) recorded sound signal and its frequency contents, and (d) surface finish

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Fig. 13

Experimental results at different infeed values (120 rpm, insert: Ceratizit five-point buttress): (a) measured FRFs before each set, (b) stability chart and the corresponding experiment point (star) for each set, and (c) and (d) sound signal and its frequency contents for set 3

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Fig. 6

Simulated shell response under threading loads: (a) stability chart for pass 1, (b) vibrations at the cutting point (1.6 mm, 1850 rpm), (c) generated surface over the first revolution, and (d) sample instantaneous shell deformation (scaled)

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Fig. 7

Experimental setup: (a) pipe with diameter 1338 in (339.7 mm) and (b) five-point buttress insert (Ceratizit, 4.371-CE-LP025)

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Fig. 14

Change in the pipe FRF after a threading pass with the final depth of 0.035 in (0.889 mm)

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Fig. 15

Effect of the damping ring on the pipe dynamics (wall thickness: 0.25 in (6.35 mm)): (a) damping ring mounted inside, (b) measured radial FRFs at the tip with and without the ring, and (c) comparison of the FRFs at low-frequency region

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Fig. 16

Effect of the damping ring on stability (Ceratizit five-point buttress insert, 120 rpm): (a) stability charts and the experiment point (star) and (b) and (c) recorded sound signals and their frequency contents

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Fig. 17

Effect of using different spindle speeds for chatter suppression (infeed: 0.020 in (0.508 mm)—set 1: two passes both at 250 rpm and set 2: first pass at 250 rpm and second pass at 225 rpm): (a) recorded sound data during the second pass in each set and (b) and (c) frequency contents of the sound signal for each case

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