0
Research Papers

Performance of Diamond and Silicon Carbide Wheels on Grinding of Bioceramic Material Under Minimum Quantity Lubrication Condition

[+] Author and Article Information
P. Suya Prem Anand

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
IIT Madras,
Chennai 600036, India
e-mail: suyaprime@yahoo.co.in

N. Arunachalam

Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
IIT Madras,
Chennai 600036, India
e-mail: chalam@iitm.ac.in

L. Vijayaraghavan

Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
IIT Madras,
Chennai 600036, India
e-mail: lvijay@iitm.ac.in

Manuscript received April 7, 2017; final manuscript received September 15, 2017; published online November 2, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Kai Cheng.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 139(12), 121019 (Nov 02, 2017) (10 pages) Paper No: MANU-17-1235; doi: 10.1115/1.4037940 History: Received April 07, 2017; Revised September 15, 2017

Advanced ceramic materials like sintered and presintered zirconia are frequently used in biomedical applications, where minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) assisted grinding is required to achieve a good surface finish instead of conventional flood coolant. However, insufficient cooling and wheel clogging are the major problems that exist in the MQL grinding process, which depends upon the type of work piece material and the grinding wheel being used. The present study is to determine the performance of the grinding wheels on presintered zirconia under MQL conditions in terms of grinding forces, specific energy, surface integrity, and wheel wear. Experiments are conducted with two different types of grinding wheels as silicon carbide (SiC) and diamond grinding wheels under the same condition. The results indicated that the diamond wheel provided a better surface finish and reduced tangential force under MQL condition, compared to the conventional SIC wheel. This was due to the reduction of wheel loading in the diamond grinding wheel. The specific energy of diamond grinding wheel was reduced with higher material removal rate compared to the conventional SiC wheel. The ground surfaces generated by the diamond grinding wheel showed fine grinding marks with better surface finish. The percentage of G-ratio calculated for the diamond wheel was higher than the SiC wheel by 77%. This was due to the sliding of the grains and less wheel loading in the diamond wheel. The cost difference between the corresponding wheels was discussed to improve the productivity of the grinding process.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Denry, I. , and Kelly, J. R. , 2008, “ State of the Art of Zirconia for Dental Applications,” Dent. Mater., 24(3), pp. 299–307. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
Kaya, G. , 2013, “ Production and Characterization of Self-Colored Dental Zirconia Blocks,” Ceram. Int., 39(1), pp. 511–517. [CrossRef]
Subramanian, K. , Ramanath, S. , and Tricard, M. , 1997, “ Mechanisms of Material Removal in the Precision Production Grinding of Ceramics,” ASME J. Manuf. Sci. Eng., 119(4A), pp. 509–519. [CrossRef]
Weinert, K. , Inasaki, I. , Sutherland, J. W. , and Wakabayashi, T. , 2004, “ Dry Machining and Minimum Quantity Lubrication,” CIRP Ann. Manuf. Technol., 53(2), pp. 511–537. [CrossRef]
Inasaki, I. , 1987, “ Grinding of Hard and Brittle Materials,” Ann. CIRP, 36(2), pp. 463–471. [CrossRef]
Cameron, A. , Bauer, R. , and Warkentin, A. , 2010, “ An Investigation of the Effects of Wheel-Cleaning Parameters in Creep-Feed Grinding,” Int. J. Mach. Tools Manuf, 50(1), pp. 126–130. [CrossRef]
Sinot, O. , Chevrier, P. , and Padilla, P. , 2006, “ Experimental Simulation of the Efficiency of High Speed Grinding Wheel Cleaning,” Int. J. Mach. Tools Manuf., 46(2), pp. 170–175. [CrossRef]
Rabiei, F. , Rahimi, A. R. , Hadad, M. J. , and Ashrafijou, M. , 2015, “ Performance Improvement of Minimum Quantity Lubrication (MQL) Technique in Surface Grinding by Modeling and Optimization,” J. Cleaner Prod., 86, pp. 447–460. [CrossRef]
Di Ilio, A. , and Paoletti, A. , 2000, “ A Comparison Between Conventional Abrasives and Superabrasives in Grinding of SiC-Aluminium Composites,” Int. J. Mach. Tools Manuf., 40(2), pp. 173–184. [CrossRef]
Shih, A. J. , McSpadden, S. B. , Morris, T. O. , Grant, M. B. , and Yonushonis, T. M. , 2000, “ High Speed and High Material Removal Rate Grinding of Ceramics Using the Vitreous Bond CBN Wheel,” Mach. Sci. Technol., 4(1), pp. 43–58. [CrossRef]
Emami, M. , Sadeghi, M. H. , and Sarhan, A. , 2013, “ Minimum Quantity Lubrication in Grinding Process of Zirconia (ZrO2) Engineering Ceramic,” Int. J. Min., Metall. Mech. Eng., 1(3), pp. 187–190. http://www.isaet.org/images/extraimages/P513561.pdf
Silva, L. R. , Corrêa, E. C. S. , Brandão, J. R. , and de Ávila, R. F. , 2013, “ Environmentally Friendly Manufacturing: Behavior Analysis of Minimum Quantity of Lubricant—MQL in Grinding Process,” J. Clean. Prod., accepted.
Brinksmeier, E. , Heinzel, C. , and Wittmann, M. , 1999, “ Friction, Cooling and Lubrication in Grinding,” CIRP Ann. Manuf. Technol., 48(2), pp. 581–598. [CrossRef]
Tawakoli, T. , Hadad, M. J. , Sadeghi, M. H. , Daneshi, A. , Stöckert, S. , and Rasifard, A. , 2009, “ An Experimental Investigation of the Effects of Workpiece and Grinding Parameters on Minimum Quantity Lubrication—MQL Grinding,” Int. J. Mach. Tools Manuf., 49(12–13), pp. 924–932. [CrossRef]
Marinescu, I. , 2007, Handbook of Advanced Ceramic Machining, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL.
Pusavec, F. , Krajnik, P. , and Kopac, J. , 2010, “ Transitioning to Sustainable Production—Part I: Application on Machining Technologies,” J. Cleaner Prod., 18(2), pp. 174–184. [CrossRef]
de Jesus Oliveira, D. , Guermandi, L. G. , Bianchi, E. C. , Diniz, A. E. , de Aguiar, P. R. , and Canarim, R. C. , 2012, “ Improving Minimum Quantity Lubrication in CBN Grinding Using Compressed Air Wheel Cleaning,” J. Mater. Process. Technol., 212(12), pp. 2559–2568. [CrossRef]
Subramanian, K. , Jain, A. , Vairamuthu, R. , and Brij Bhushan, M. , 2015, “ Tribology as an Enabler for Innovation in Surface Generation Processes,” ASME Paper No. IMECE2015-52952.
Malkin, S. , and Guo, C. , 2008, Grinding Technology: Theory and Application of Machining With Abrasives, Industrial Press, New York.
Li, K. , and Liao, T. W. , 1997, “ Modelling of Ceramic Grinding Processes—Part I: Number of Cutting Points and Grinding Forces Per Grit,” J. Mater. Process. Technol., 65(1–3), pp. 1–10. [CrossRef]
Hwang, T. W. , and Malkin, S. , 1999, “ Grinding Mechanisms and Energy Balance for Ceramics,” ASME J. Manuf. Sci. Eng., 121(4), pp. 623–631. [CrossRef]

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Photograph of experimental setup

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Effects of wheel speed on grinding forces: (a) specific normal force and (b) specific tangential force

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Effects of radial depth of cut on grinding forces: (a) specific normal force and (b) specific tangential force

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Force ratio: (a) diamond wheel and (b) SiC wheel

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Influence of undeformed chip thickness on the specific grinding energy: (a) diamond wheel and (b) SiC wheel

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

SEM images of ground surfaces diamond wheel: (a) 22 m/s, (b) 32 m/s, (c) 42 m/s and SiC wheel, (d) 22 m/s, (e) 32 m/s, and (f) 42 m/s

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

(a) Effects of wheel speed on surface roughness and (b) three-dimensional confocal image of ground surface generated by diamond wheel at 32 m/s wheel speed

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Number of grinding passes with respect to (a) normal force and (b) tangential force

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Optical images of grinding wheel surface, diamond wheel: (a) 120 passes, (b) 240 passes, SiC wheel (c) 120 passes, and (d) 240 passes

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Stereo microscopic images and grain protrusion height of diamond grinding wheel topography (a, b) after 280 passes and (c, d) after dressing

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Stereo microscopic images and grain protrusion height of SiC grinding wheel topography (a, b) after 280 passes and (c, d) after dressing

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In