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Research Papers

Thermomechanical Analysis of an Electrically Assisted Wire Drawing Process

[+] Author and Article Information
Antonio J. Sánchez Egea

Department of Mechanical Engineering
(EPSEVG),
Universitat Politécnica de Catalunya,
Av. de Víctor Balaguer 1, Vilanova i la Geltrú,
Barcelona 08800, Spain;
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Northwestern University,
2145 Sheridan Road,
Evanston, IL 60208
e-mail: antonio.egea@upc.edu

Hernán A. González Rojas

Department of Mechanical Engineering
(EPSEVG),
Universitat Politécnica de Catalunya,
Av. de Víctor Balaguer 1,
Vilanova i la Geltrú,
Barcelona 08800, Spain
e-mail: hernan.gonzalez@upc.edu

Diego J. Celentano

Department of Mechanical and Metallurgical
Engineering,
Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile,
Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860,
Region Metropolitana 7820436, Chile
e-mail: dcelentano@ing.puc.cl

Jordi Jorba Perió

Department of Materials Science and
Metallurgical Engineering (EEBE),
Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya,
Av. D'Eduard Maristany, 10-14,
Barcelona 08930, Spain
e-mail: jordi.jorba@upc.edu

Jian Cao

Fellow ASME
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Northwestern University,
2145 Sheridan Road,
Evanston, IL 60208
e-mail: jcao@northwestern.edu

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received December 9, 2016; final manuscript received August 18, 2017; published online September 18, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Gracious Ngaile.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 139(11), 111017 (Sep 18, 2017) (7 pages) Paper No: MANU-16-1632; doi: 10.1115/1.4037798 History: Received December 09, 2016; Revised August 18, 2017

Electrically assisted (EA) wire drawing process is a hybrid manufacturing process characterized by enhancement of the formability, ductility, and elongation of the wire drawn specimen. A thermomechanical model to describe the change of the mechanical response due to the thermal contribution is proposed in this work. Additionally, a numerical simulation was conducted to study the potential and limitations of this hybrid process by using two different hardening laws: a phenomenological and a dislocation-based hardening laws. The results show how the flow stress, the effective plastic strain, and residual stresses behave under the electroplusing effect. In addition, electron backscattered diffraction was used to study the electropulsing treatments on the microstructure during cold drawing. It is observed a decrease of the high- and low-angle grain boundaries (LAGB) for samples deformed with electropulsing. This detwinning process has a strong influence on the strain hardening by improving the material formability. It was shown that the two proposed hardening laws adequately describe the EA wire drawing process showing a similar mechanical behavior. Nevertheless, the dislocation-based hardening law has the potential to be generalized to many other material and process configurations without extensive number of material tests as the phenomenological hardening law would require.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Layout of the experimental setup used for the electropulsing-assisted wire drawing process

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Fig. 2

Effective plastic strain distribution along the radial coordinate at the die exit section

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Fig. 3

Equivalent radial stress evolution at the die exit section

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Fig. 4

Residual equivalent stress distribution along the radial coordinate

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Fig. 5

Misorientation angle distributions of as-received, CD, and EA wires of 308 L stainless steel

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Fig. 6

LAGB formation within the grains of CD and EA specimens of 308 L stainless steel

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Fig. 7

Center and surface material hardness of the as-received, CD, and EA specimens

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