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Research Papers

A Novel Incremental Sheet Bending Process of Complex Curved Steel Plate

[+] Author and Article Information
Qiyang Zuo

Shenzhen Key Laboratory
of Precision Engineering,
Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Shenzhen 518055, China;
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Northwestern University,
2145 Sheridan Road,
Evanston, IL 60208
e-mail: qy.zuo@siat.ac.cn

Kai He

Shenzhen Key Laboratory
of Precision Engineering,
Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
1068 Xueyuan Avenue, Xili Nanshan,
Shenzhen 518055, China
e-mail: kai.he@siat.ac.cn

Xiaobing Dang

Department of Mechanical and
Automation Engineering,
Institute of Precision Engineering,
The Chinese University of Hong Kong,
Room 110, William M. W. Mong
Engineering Building,
CUHK, Shatin, New Territories,
Hong Kong, China
e-mail: xbdang@mae.cuhk.edu.hk

Wei Feng

Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
1068 Xueyuan Avenue, Xili Nanshan,
Shenzhen 518055, China
e-mail: wei.feng@siat.ac.cn

Ruxu Du

Professor
F-ASME, F-SME, F-HKIE,
Department of Mechanical and
Automation Engineering,
Institute of Precision Engineering,
The Chinese University of Hong Kong,
Room 209, William M.W. Mong
Engineering Building,
CUHK, Shatin, New Territories,
Hong Kong, China
e-mail: rdu@mae.cuhk.edu.hk

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received April 7, 2017; final manuscript received July 2, 2017; published online September 13, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Gracious Ngaile.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 139(11), 111005 (Sep 13, 2017) (12 pages) Paper No: MANU-17-1236; doi: 10.1115/1.4037428 History: Received April 07, 2017; Revised July 02, 2017

Bending complex curved steel plates for constructing ship hull has long been a challenge in shipbuilding industry. This paper presents a novel incremental bending process to obtain complicated curved steel plates by a series of sequential and layered punches. Taking advantage of this process, the blank plate that is fixed and held by a flexible supporting system can incrementally be bent into the target shape by a press tool along a planned tool path step by step and layer by layer. Acting as a “lower die,” the flexible supporting system can provide flexible and multifunctional supports for the work piece during the forming process, whose four general motion modes are demonstrated in this paper. Meanwhile, the procedures of tool path planning and forming layering are also explained in detail. In addition, aiming at different motion modes of the flexible supporting system, two springback compensation methods are given. Furthermore, according to the forming principle presented in this paper, an original incremental prototype equipment was designed and manufactured, which is mainly composed of a three-axis computer numerical control (CNC) machine, a flexible supporting system, and a three-dimensional (3D) scanning feedback system. A series of forming experiments focusing on a gradual curvature shape were carried out using this prototype to investigate the feasibility and validity of this forming process.

Copyright © 2017 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of incremental punching process

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Fig. 2

Flow chart of forming process

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Fig. 3

Illustration of four general motion modes

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Fig. 4

Schematic tool path planning

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Fig. 5

Marked point of pressing positions on XY plane

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Fig. 6

Schematic forming layering

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Fig. 7

Illustration of stroke feed calculation

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Fig. 8

Calculation flow chart of stroke feed

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Fig. 9

Schematic trial compensation method

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Fig. 10

Schematic iterative layering compensation method

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Fig. 11

Schematic calculation of supporting pillar height

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Fig. 12

Photograph of the prototype equipment, showing its configuration

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Fig. 13

Photographs of the flexible supporting system and all kinds of press tools

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Fig. 14

CAD model of the target work piece

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Fig. 15

Tool path planning the experiment (blank sheet size: 330 × 450 × 2.5 mm)

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Fig. 16

Photograph and 3D image of the formed work piece, respectively

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Fig. 17

Difference distribution along the Z-axial direction between the target and the formed work piece

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Fig. 18

Comparative influence of different rotating radii on forming quality

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