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Research Papers

Tool Path Generation for Turbine Blades Machining With Twin Tool

[+] Author and Article Information
Dun Lu

State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing
Systems Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710054, China
e-mail: dunnlu@xjtu.edu.cn

Jun Liu

State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing
Systems Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710054, China
e-mail: 1058364572@qq.com

Wanhua Zhao

State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing
Systems Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710054, China
e-mail: whzhao@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

Bingheng Lu

State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing
Systems Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710054, China
e-mail: bhlu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

Diaodiao Wu

State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing
Systems Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710054, China
e-mail: wdd_chibi@stu.xjtu.edu.cn

Dongdong Song

State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing
Systems Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710054, China
e-mail: sdd1213@126.com

Fei Xue

State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing
Systems Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710054, China
e-mail: xuefei82@xjtu.edu.cn

Bing Cheng

State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing
Systems Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710054, China
e-mail: 1973341603@qq.com

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received December 22, 2016; final manuscript received July 11, 2017; published online September 13, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Laine Mears.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 139(11), 111015 (Sep 13, 2017) (10 pages) Paper No: MANU-16-1670; doi: 10.1115/1.4037423 History: Received December 22, 2016; Revised July 11, 2017

Blades are essential parts used in thermal and nuclear power generation. Its machining precision is a vital factor that influences the efficiency and life of those industries. Blades are thin-walled parts, which could easily deform under cutting forces, and hence deteriorate the machining precision. In our previous work, a milling process with twin tool for blade is proposed, in which two tools are assigned to machine the basin and dorsal surfaces simultaneously. It is expected that the cutting forces acted on the basin and dorsal surfaces can be counteracted to reduce the deformation of the blade. In this study, a method of twin-tool paths generation is developed. The tool center points and tool axis vectors are generated with consideration of the cutting forces balance, the machine tool kinematics, the surface geometric precision, and the same number of tool paths on basin and dorsal surfaces. Virtual machining, finite element analysis, and trial cutting are carried out and verified that the method which is used for generating the twin-tool paths is successful. The basin and dorsal surfaces have the same number of tool paths and tool contact point coordinates, which guarantees that the two surfaces can be completely machined and can be machined and finished simultaneously. Furthermore, the cutting forces acted on the basin and dorsal surfaces can achieve the balance along the twin-tool paths. Therefore, the deformation of a blade caused by cutting force is obviously reduced compared with a conventional machining process with a single tool.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Blade machining process with twin tool and machine tool kinematics: (a) blade machining with twin tool, (b) the machine tool kinematics, and (c) geometry constraint between tools axis vectors of tool B and tool D caused by the machine tool kinematics

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Fig. 2

Effective cutting radius along the leading direction

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Fig. 3

Geometry relationships among the cutting width, effective cutting radius, and scallop height

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Fig. 4

Cutting force prediction model for blade machining with a bull nose tool

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Fig. 5

Cutting forces balancing strategy for twin-tool machining

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Fig. 6

Flowchart of tool path generation for the blade-machining with twin tool

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Fig. 7

Tool contact points and tool axis vectors for the blade machining with twin tool

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Fig. 8

The nine-axis machine tool for blade machining with twin tool: (a) the kinematic chains and (b) the construction and layout

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Fig. 9

Virtual simulation for the blade machining with twin tool: (a) machined surface on basin and dorsal, (b) pulling milling during go-paths, (c) pulling milling during return-paths, and (d) finish of machining simultaneously

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Fig. 10

Geometry error of virtual-machined surfaces: (a) basin surface and (b) dorsal surface

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Fig. 11

Comparison of blade deformation machined by twin tool and single tool

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Fig. 12

Trial cutting for both basin and dorsal surfaces with twin tool simultaneously

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