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research-article

Grinding energy modeling based on friction, plowing and shearing

[+] Author and Article Information
Barbara Linke

ASME member University of California Davis, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, 1 Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616, USA
bslinke@ucdavis.edu

Ian Garretson

University of California Davis, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, 1 Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616, USA
icgarretson@ucdavis.edu

Francois M. Torner

University of Kaiserslautern, Institute for Measurement and Sensor-Technology, Gottlieb-Daimler-Straße, 67663 Kaiserslautern, Germany
torner@mv.uni-kl.de

Jörg Seewig

University of Kaiserslautern, Institute for Measurement and Sensor-Technology, Gottlieb-Daimler-Straße, 67663 Kaiserslautern, Germany
seewig@mv.uni-kl.de

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4037239 History: Received March 30, 2017; Revised June 15, 2017

Abstract

Grinding is an important abrasive machining process at the end of many process chains. Understanding energy transformation in grinding is not only important to improve energy efficiency, but it is crucial for understanding the chip formation process itself. Grinding energy can be studied at the macroscopic or microscopic levels, wherein the entire grinding tool is considered or the phenomena at the single cutting edges are studied. This paper explores existing energy modeling approaches in grinding with particular emphasis on physical models. Models on energy transformation during the ductile grit-workpiece engagement for three regimes – being friction, plowing, and shearing – are explained. In addition to the critical depth of cut when chip formation starts, a critical depth when plowing begins is introduced to divide between the different regimes. Selected models for each regime are combined to an integrated grinding energy model that allows researchers to investigate forces and energy during grit engagement.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
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