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Review Article

Analysis of friction stir riveting processes: A review

[+] Author and Article Information
Haris Ali Khan

The Harold and Inge Marcus Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Penn State University, State College, PA 16801, USA
hak15@psu.edu

Jingjing Li

Associate Professor, The Harold and Inge Marcus Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Penn State University, State College, PA 16801, USA
jul572@engr.psu.edu

Chenhui Shao

Assistant Professor, Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
chshao@illinois.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4036909 History: Received February 16, 2017; Revised May 19, 2017

Abstract

This study presents detailed analyses of variant joining processes under the category of friction stir riveting (FSR) that are applied to assemble similar or dissimilar materials by integrating the advantages of both friction stir process and mechanical fastening. It covers the operating principle of FSR methods along with the insights into various process parameters responsible for successful joint formation. The paper further evaluates the researches in friction stir-based riveting processes which unearth the enhanced metallurgical and mechanical properties, for instance microstructure refinement, local mechanical properties, and improved strength, corrosion and fatigue resistance. Advantages and limitations of the FSR processes are then presented. The study is concluded by summarizing the key analyses and proposing the potential areas for future research.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
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