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Research Papers

Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of Skin-Pass Rolling and New Models for Process Control

[+] Author and Article Information
Sung Jin Yoon

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
POSTECH,
Pohang 37673, South Korea
e-mail: sungjin@postech.ac.kr

Tae Jin Shin

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
POSTECH,
Pohang 37673, South Korea
e-mail: tjshin@postech.ac.kr

Jae Sang Lee

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
POSTECH,
Pohang 37673, South Korea
e-mail: ljs5119@postech.ac.kr

Sang Moo Hwang

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
POSTECH,
Pohang 37673, South Korea
e-mail: smhwang@postech.ac.kr

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received November 11, 2016; final manuscript received May 21, 2017; published online June 22, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Yannis Korkolis.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 139(9), 091003 (Jun 22, 2017) (10 pages) Paper No: MANU-16-1596; doi: 10.1115/1.4036910 History: Received November 11, 2016; Revised May 21, 2017

This paper describes in detail the deformation behavior of the rolls and strip predicted from the three-dimensional finite element analysis of skin-pass rolling. The predictions are made on the basis of the coupled analysis of elastic deformation of the rolls and elastic–plastic deformation of the strip. Predictions from the proposed finite element (FE) model are compared with experimental data from laboratory-scale cold rolling mills. Then, proposed are models for the prediction of the roll force profile and for the prediction of the residual stress profile. The prediction accuracy of the models is examined through comparison with the predictions from the FE model.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

An illustrative sketch of the strip mesh used for FE simulation. The number of elements used along the rolling direction is substantially greater than that shown in this figure.

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Fig. 2

Meshes of work roll and backup roll used for FE simulation

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Fig. 3

Mesh density at the interface between the work roll and the backup roll, along the roll arc

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Fig. 4

Boundary conditions used for the work roll and for the backup roll

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Fig. 5

Flow chart for the coupled analysis of the deformation of work roll, backup roll, and strip

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Fig. 6

Strip profile, prediction, and measurement. Process conditions are described in Table 1, as cold rolling (1). Experimental data are from POSCO research laboratories [16].

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Fig. 7

Strip profile, prediction, and measurement. Process conditions are described in Table 1, as cold rolling (2). Experimental data are from Ref. [25].

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Fig. 8

Classification of the deformation zones appearing in the strip during rolling. Process conditions are described as case 1 in Table 2. The residual stress distributions in the upstream steady-state zone are edge wave type (see Fig. 15) which may clearly be seen in the figure.

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Fig. 9

(a) Effective plastic strain rate distribution in the strip, in s−1 and (b) effective plastic strain distribution in the strip, for case 1

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Fig. 10

Thickness distributions along the rolling direction at various positions across the strip width, for case 1

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Fig. 11

Roll pressure distributions at the center and at the edge

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Fig. 12

Frictional stress distributions at the center and at the edge

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Fig. 13

Roll force profile across the strip width

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Fig. 14

Deformed roll profile. The profile is extracted along the line of minimum thickness across the strip width.

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Fig. 15

Residual stress profiles at the upstream steady-state zone, for cases 1–5

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Fig. 16

Residual stress profiles at the downstream steady-state zone, predicted from FE simulation. (a) When the upstream steady-state zone is stress free and (b) when there exist stress distributions at the upstream steady-state zone. The upstream stress distributions are shown in Fig. 15.

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Fig. 17

Effective plastic strain rate distributions in the predeformation zone, predicted from FE simulation, for case 1, with the roll speed = 6676 mm/s. Stress distributions in the upstream steady-state zone are (a) edge wave type, (b) flat type, and (c) center buckle type.

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Fig. 18

Plastic strain distributions at the downstream steady-state zone, predicted from FE simulation, for case 1

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Fig. 19

εyp(z), predicted from FEM and the present model

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Fig. 20

εyp(z), predicted from FEM and the present model (continued)

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Fig. 21

Δεxp(z), predicted from FEM and the present model

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Fig. 22

Δεxp(z), predicted from FEM and the present model (continued)

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Fig. 23

Residual stress profiles at the downstream steady-state zone, predicted from the present model

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Fig. 24

(a) Back tension profile at roll entrance and (b) front tension profile at roll exit

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Fig. 25

Variation of parameter a with reduction

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Fig. 26

Roll force profiles predicted from the present model

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Fig. 27

Roll force profiles predicted from FEM and the present model

Tables

Errata

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