0
Review Article

A Review of Electrically-Assisted Manufacturing With Emphasis on Modeling and Understanding of the Electroplastic Effect

[+] Author and Article Information
Brandt J. Ruszkiewicz

Mem. ASME
International Center for Automotive Research,
Clemson University,
Greenville, SC 29607
e-mail: brandtruszki@gmail.com

Tyler Grimm

Mem. ASME
Advanced Manufacturing and Innovation Center,
Penn State Erie, The Behrend College,
Erie, PA 16563
e-mail: grimmtyler95@gmail.com

Ihab Ragai

Mem. ASME
Burke Research and Economic
Development Center,
The Pennsylvania State University,
Erie, PA 16563
e-mail: ifr1@psu.edu

Laine Mears

Mem. ASME
International Center for Automotive Research,
Clemson University,
Greenville, SC 29607
e-mail: mears@clemson.edu

John T. Roth

Fellow ASME
Advanced Manufacturing and Innovation Center,
Penn State Erie, The Behrend College,
Erie, PA 16563
e-mail: jtr11@psu.edu

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received January 20, 2017; final manuscript received May 5, 2017; published online September 13, 2017. Editor: Y. Lawrence Yao.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 139(11), 110801 (Sep 13, 2017) (15 pages) Paper No: MANU-17-1033; doi: 10.1115/1.4036716 History: Received January 20, 2017; Revised May 05, 2017

Increasingly strict fuel efficiency standards have driven the aerospace and automotive industries to improve the fuel economy of their fleets. A key method for feasibly improving the fuel economy is by decreasing the weight, which requires the introduction of materials with high strength to weight ratios into airplane and vehicle designs. Many of these materials are not as formable or machinable as conventional low carbon steels, making production difficult when using traditional forming and machining strategies and capital. Electrical augmentation offers a potential solution to this dilemma through enhancing process capabilities and allowing for continued use of existing equipment. The use of electricity to aid in deformation of metallic materials is termed as electrically assisted manufacturing (EAM). The direct effect of electricity on the deformation of metallic materials is termed as electroplastic effect. This paper presents a summary of the current state-of-the-art in using electric current to augment existing manufacturing processes for processing of higher-strength materials. Advantages of this process include flow stress and forming force reduction, increased formability, decreased elastic recovery, fracture mode transformation from brittle to ductile, decreased overall process energy, and decreased cutting forces in machining. There is currently a lack of agreement as to the underlying mechanisms of the electroplastic effect. Therefore, this paper presents the four main existing theories and the experimental understanding of these theories, along with modeling approaches for understanding and predicting the electroplastic effect.

Copyright © 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Uniaxial tension behavior in electrically assisted tension of commercially pure titanium [116]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Pulsed current tension on 5754 aluminum [60]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Brittle to ductile transformation in electrically assisted impression die forging [3]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

CCD versus nonconstant current density compression of 304 stainless steel [1]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Current density's effect on energy requirement for open die forging of various metals [6]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Elimination of Springback in 6111 Aluminum using postforming pulsing [75]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Electrically assisted compression versus isothermal compression for titanium [65]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Heated tension of 6061-T6511 versus annealed and electrically pulsed specimens [86]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Redrawn flow stress prediction versus experiment for 45 A/mm2, note the inability to predict the large flow stress reduction [117]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Temperature prediction for two current densities [117]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Energy balance diagram for electrically assisted forging [74]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Temperature prediction versus actual test: (a) without an EEC and (b) with proper EEC value [126]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Model versus experiment for electrically assisted compression of 304 stainless [74]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Nodal setup for explicit energy solution to calculate temperature [58] (Reprinted with permission from © 2012 Joshua Jones.)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

Temperature prediction using an energy balance for electrically assisted tension for stationary and deformation testing [58] (Reprinted with permission from © 2012 Joshua Jones.)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 16

Flow stress prediction using modified power law and energy balance [58] (Reprinted with permission from © 2012 Joshua Jones.)

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In