0
research-article

Effect of Particle Size Distribution on Powder Packing and Sintering in Binder Jetting Additive Manufacturing of metals

[+] Author and Article Information
Yun Bai

Design, Research, and Education for Additive Manufacturing Systems Laboratory Department of Mechanical Engineering Virginia Tech
yunbai@vt.edu

Grady Wagner

Design, Research, and Education for Additive Manufacturing Systems Laboratory Department of Mechanical Engineering Virginia Tech
gradyw@vt.edu

Christopher Williams

Design, Research, and Education for Additive Manufacturing Systems Laboratory Department of Mechanical Engineering Virginia Tech
cbwill@vt.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4036640 History: Received December 14, 2016; Revised April 19, 2017

Abstract

The Binder Jetting Additive Manufacturing process provides an economical and scalable means of fabricating complex parts from a wide variety of materials. While it is often used to fabricate metal parts, the performance metrics of the resulting sintered parts (e.g., thermal, electrical, and mechanical properties) are typically lower than traditionally manufactured counterparts due to challenges in achieving full theoretical density. This can be attributed to the inherently low green density and the constraint on powder particle size imposed by challenges in recoating fine powders. To address this issue, the authors explored the use of bimodal powder mixtures in the context of Binder Jetting of copper. A demonstrated benefit of using bimodal powder mixtures is discussed in this work, along with a study on the effectiveness of changing particle size distribution on improving sintered density and reducing shrinkage.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In