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research-article

Residual stress distribution in silicon wafers machined by rotational grinding

[+] Author and Article Information
Ping Zhou

Key Laboratory for Precision and Non-traditional Machining Technology of Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, China
pzhou.zj.cn@gmail.com

Ying Yan

Key Laboratory for Precision and Non-traditional Machining Technology of Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, China
yanying@dlut.edu.cn

Ning Huang

Key Laboratory for Precision and Non-traditional Machining Technology of Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, China
544312445@qq.com

Ziguang Wang

Key Laboratory for Precision and Non-traditional Machining Technology of Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, China
wzg1107@mail.dlut.edu.cn

Renke Kang

Key Laboratory for Precision and Non-traditional Machining Technology of Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, China
kangrk@dlut.edu.cn

Dongming Guo

Key Laboratory for Precision and Non-traditional Machining Technology of Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, China
guodm@dlut.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4036125 History: Received November 21, 2016; Revised February 12, 2017

Abstract

Subsurface damage (SSD) and grinding damage induced stress (GDIS) are the focus of attention in the study of grinding mechanism. Our previous study proposed a load identification method and analyzed the GDIS in a silicon wafer ground [1]. In this paper, a more concise method for GDIS analysis is proposed. The new method is based on the curvature analysis of the chip deformation, and a deterministic solution of residual stress can be derived out. Relying on the new method, the GDIS distribution feature in the silicon wafer ground by a #600 diamond wheel (average grit size 24 ?m) is studied. The analysis results show that the two principal stresses in the damage layer is more close to each other than that ground by the #3000 diamond wheel (average grit size 4 ?m), which indicates that the GDIS feature in ground silicon wafer is related to the depth of damage layer. Moreover, the GDIS distribution presents a correlation with crystalline orientation. To clarify these results, the SSD is observed by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It is found that the type of the defects under the surface is more divers and chaotic than that observed in silicon surface ground by the #3000 diamond wheel. Additionally, it is found that most of the cracks generate and propagate along the slip plane maybe due to the high shear stress and high dislocation density instead of the tensile stress which is recognized as the dominant factor of crack generation in brittle materials grinding process.

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