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Research Papers

Experimental, Theoretical, and Simulation Comparative Study of Nano Surface Roughness Generated During Abrasive Flow Finishing Process

[+] Author and Article Information
Sachin Singh

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati,
Guwahati 781 039, India

Deepu Kumar

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati,
Guwahati 781 039, India

Mamilla Ravi Sankar

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati,
Guwahati 781 039, India
e-mail: evmrs@iitg.ernet.in

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received September 7, 2016; final manuscript received December 2, 2016; published online January 31, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Radu Pavel.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 139(6), 061014 (Jan 31, 2017) (12 pages) Paper No: MANU-16-1487; doi: 10.1115/1.4035417 History: Received September 07, 2016; Revised December 02, 2016

Abrasive flow finishing (AFF) is one of the advanced finishing processes used mainly for finishing of complex surface features. Nano finishing of aluminum alloys is difficult using conventional finishing processes because of its soft nature. So, in this work, aluminum alloys are finished using AFF process. Since the finishing is carried out using polymer rheological abrasive medium (medium), the finishing forces on aluminum alloy workpieces are too low compared to conventional finishing processes. Thus, this process generates nano surface roughness on aluminum alloy. By using the theoretical model, change in surface roughness (ΔRa) with respect to various AFF input parameters is studied. A new simulation model is proposed in this paper to predict the finishing forces and ΔRa during AFF process. Modeling of finishing forces generated during the AFF process is carried out using ansys polyflow. These forces are used as input in the simulation model to predict ΔRa. Medium rheology decides the magnitude of the generated finishing forces in AFF process. Therefore, to predict the forces accurately, rheological properties of the medium are measured experimentally and used as input during modeling. Further, to make the simulation more realistic, abrasive particle bluntness with respect to extrusion pressure and number of strokes is considered. Because of considering these realistic conditions, simulation and experimental results are in better agreement compared to theoretical results.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

(a) Overview of the abrasive flow finishing process experimental setup and schematic of medium flow in the finishing region, (b) Al alloy workpiece, and (c) workpiece holder along with locking plate

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Fig. 2

Domain used for FEM modeling of axisymmetric flow of viscoelastic medium during AFF process with boundary conditions (V1 = V2 = 30.5, V3 = 13.4, H1 = H2 = 75, H3 = H4 = 74, and H5 = 50 (all the dimensions are in millimeter))

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Fig. 3

Overview of the parallel plate rheometer for carryout rheological characterization (Anton Paar MCR-301 series)

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Fig. 4

(a) Variation of viscosity with shear rate and effect of frequency on (b) storage modulus (Pa) and (c) loss modulus (Pa) (logarithmic scale on X and Y axes) for different weight percentage of plasticizer

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Fig. 5

Variation of predicted average (a) radial stress on a single abrasive particle with respect to extrusion pressure (10% of plasticizer content) and (b) radial stress on a single abrasive particle with respect to weight percentage of plasticizer (6 MPa extrusion pressure)

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Fig. 6

(a) Medium slug showing active abrasive particles in the finishing region, (b) schematic showing the arrangement for viewing the medium under optical microscope, (c) medium surface under microscope for determining active particles density, and (d) magnified view of the medium for determining active abrasive particles density

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Fig. 7

(a) Schematic diagram of the indentation of an abrasive particle on the workpiece surface and (b) simplified surface geometry

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Fig. 8

(a) Schematic view of the medium slug containing abrasive particles and (b) a small volume of the medium used for simulation and (c) initial surface roughness profile of the workpiece surface (Ra = 0.51 μm) taken from profilometer

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Fig. 10

Effect of number of AFF strokes on abrasive bluntness: (a) schematic diagram showing the method of bluntness measurement, (b) initial sharp abrasive particle, and (c) abrasive particle after 800 AFF strokes (extrusion pressure 6 MPa; # 220; and wt.% of plasticizer 10%)

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Fig. 11

Effect of extrusion pressure (8 MPa) on abrasive particles bluntness (number of AFF strokes 400; # 220; and wt.% of plasticizer 10%)

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Fig. 13

Effect of frequency on storage modulus

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Fig. 14

Comparison of change in surface roughness, ΔRa with extrusion pressure (number of AFF strokes 400; # 220; and wt.% of plasticizer 10%) during experimentation, simulation, and theoretical results

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Fig. 15

Microscopic view of the workpiece surface (a) initial and (b) at 5 MPa (number of AFF strokes 400; # 220; and wt.% of plasticizer 10%)

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Fig. 16

Comparison of change in surface roughness, ΔRa with number of strokes (N) (extrusion pressure 6 MPa; # 220; and wt.% of plasticizer 10%) during experimentation, simulation, and theoretical results

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Fig. 17

Microscopic view of the workpiece surface at various AFF strokes (a) initial, (b) 500, (c) 600, and (d) 800 (extrusion pressure 6 MPa; # 220; and wt.% of plasticizer 10%)

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Fig. 18

(a) Effect of temperature on shear viscosity of abrasive medium, (b) continuous polymer chains holding abrasive particles without considering temperature effect, and (c) polymer chains disintegrate and move apart due to temperature effect

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Fig. 19

Comparison of change in surface roughness, ΔRa with weight percentage of plasticizer content in the medium (extrusion pressure 6 MPa; # 220; number of AFF strokes 400) during experimentation, simulation, and theoretical results

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Fig. 20

Schematic diagram showing the effect of weight percentage of plasticizer on the medium properties at various conditions: (a) low, (b) optimum, and (c) high

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