0
Research Papers

Dynamics and Stability Prediction of Five-Axis Flat-End Milling

[+] Author and Article Information
YaoAn Lu

State Key Laboratory of
Mechanical System and Vibration,
School of Mechanical Engineering,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: luyaoan028@163.com

Ye Ding

State Key Laboratory of
Mechanical System and Vibration,
School of Mechanical Engineering,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: y.ding@sjtu.edu.cn

LiMin Zhu

State Key Laboratory of
Mechanical System and Vibration,
School of Mechanical Engineering,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: zhulm@sjtu.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received August 19, 2016; final manuscript received December 4, 2016; published online February 8, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Tony Schmitz.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 139(6), 061015 (Feb 08, 2017) (11 pages) Paper No: MANU-16-1453; doi: 10.1115/1.4035422 History: Received August 19, 2016; Revised December 04, 2016

The tool orientation of a flat-end cutter, determined by the lead and tilt angles of the cutter, can be optimized to increase the machining strip width. However, few studies focus on the effects of tool orientation on the five-axis milling process stability with flat-end cutters. Stability prediction starts with cutting force prediction, and the cutting force prediction is affected by the cutter-workpiece engagement (CWE). The engagement geometries occur between the flat-end cutter and the in-process workpiece (IPW) are complicated in five-axis milling, making the stability analysis for five-axis flat-end milling difficult. The robust discrete vector method (DVM) is adopted to identify the CWE for flat-end millings, and it can be extended to apply to general cutter millings. The milling system is then modeled as a two-degrees-of-freedom spring-mass-damper system with the predicted cutting forces. Thereafter, a general formulation for the dynamic milling system is developed considering the regenerative effect and the mode coupling effect simultaneously. Finally, an enhanced numerical integration method (NIM) is developed to predict the stability limits in flat-end milling with different tool orientations. Effectiveness of the strategy is validated by conducting experiments on five-axis flat-end milling.

Copyright © 2017 by ASME
Topics: Stability , Cutting , Milling
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Local, cutter, and work coordinate systems

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Discrete vector method and cutting simulation

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

The projection of the tool surface and the workpiece surface on the xy plane

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Schematic of intersection point determination in the CCS

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Schematic of FCS (a) the boundary partition of a cutter surface and (b) feasible contact surface

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Intersection points, envelope boundaries, and FCS

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Cutter-workpiece engagement: (a) engagement region, (b) engagement region in cutter surface, and (c) ϕ–z plane

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Illustration of a dynamic milling system

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Convergence of the eigenvalues with different NIMs for the milling system with a straight flute cutter

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Convergence of the eigenvalues with different NIMs for the milling system with a helical flute cutter

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Tests setup: (a) setup in cutting test and (b) impact test

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Frequency response functions of the machine-tool system: (a) Hxx, (b) Hyy, and (c) Hyx

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Schematic of the tool path in the cutting experiments

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

The computed SLD and the experimental results with tilt angle ω=0 deg. The symbols are classified as follows: o is stable milling status; x is unstable milling status; Δ is not clearly stable or unstable.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

Cutting forces, force spectrums, and finished surfaces for the selected parameter points A, B, C, and D in Fig. 14: (a) point A (7600 rpm, 0 deg) and point C (6200 rpm, 10 deg) and (b) point B (7000 rpm, 0 deg) and point D (7000 rpm, 5 deg)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 16

The computed SLD and the experimental results with lead angle λ=5 deg. The symbols are classified as follows: o is stable milling status; x is unstable milling status; Δ is not clearly stable or unstable.

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In