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Research Papers

The Effect of Stepped Field Shaper on Magnetic Pressure and Radial Displacement in Electromagnetic Inside Bead Forming: Experimental and Simulation Analyses Using maxwell and abaqus Software

[+] Author and Article Information
Rasoul Chaharmiri

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Amirkabir University of Technology,
Tehran 15875-4413, Iran
e-mail: chaharmiri@aut.ac.ir

Alireza Fallahi Arezoodar

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Amirkabir University of Technology,
424 Hafez Avenue,
Tehran 15875-4413, Iran
e-mail: afallahi@aut.ac.ir

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received August 15, 2016; final manuscript received November 7, 2016; published online January 11, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Yannis Korkolis.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 139(6), 061003 (Jan 11, 2017) (6 pages) Paper No: MANU-16-1429; doi: 10.1115/1.4035219 History: Received August 15, 2016; Revised November 07, 2016

Electromagnetic forming (EMF) is a high strain rate forming technology which can effectively deform and shape high electrically conductive materials at room temperature. A field shaper is frequently used for concentrating the magnetic pressure in the desired forming area. The geometric parameters of a field shaper, as an intermediate device, affect the magnetic pressure and radial displacement in electromagnetic inside bead forming. EMF consists of electromagnetic and mechanical parts simulated using maxwell and abaqus software, respectively. The effects of geometric parameters of the stepped field shaper on magnetic pressure and radial displacement were investigated, and the best parameters were determined. Experimental tests were performed at various discharge voltages and the results were compared with simulation. The results indicated that using the stepped field shaper, the magnetic pressure concentration ratio increased from about 23–85% in comparison with using a direct coil. The maximum magnetic pressure increased by approximately 21% due to the effective concentration of magnetic pressure. Consequently, regardless of the electromagnetic energy losses because of using a field shaper, the radial displacement increased by 8% in simulation and 6% in experiment. The result of this study would be also helpful in designing field shapers in similar applications which is highly crucial and strongly recommended.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 3

Current versus time diagram in electromagnetic forming with stepped field shaper at discharge voltage of 5300 V

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Fig. 4

Magnetic pressure versus tube length diagram at different times in electromagnetic forming process at discharge voltage of 5300 V

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Fig. 6

Empirical fit on true stress–strain data of Al6061-T6 material and J–C parameters

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Fig. 7

Electromagnetic forming machine and the equipment

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Fig. 8

Experimental setup of the C53 coil, beading die, and workpiece

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Fig. 2

maxwell model (C100 coil) with stepped field shaper

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Fig. 1

Meshed maxwell model for C53 coil, die, and tube

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Fig. 5

Radial displacements (dmax) of the deformed tube at discharge voltage of 5300 V

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Fig. 9

Experimental setup of the C100 coil with stepped field shaper: (a) the tube before and (b) after electromagnetic forming

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Fig. 10

Magnetic pressure distribution and maximum radial displacements at various thickness ratios at time of 38 μs

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Fig. 11

Magnetic pressure distribution and maximum radial displacements at various effective lengths at time of 38 μs

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Fig. 12

Magnetic pressure distribution and maximum radial displacements at various overall lengths at time of 38 μs

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Fig. 13

Magnetic pressure distributions at various discharge voltages by the C53 coil and the C100 coil with the optimized stepped filed shaper at time of 38 μs

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