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Research Papers

Solutions for Sustainable Machining

[+] Author and Article Information
Eckart Uhlmann

Professor
Institute for Machine Tools and
Factory Management,
Technische Universität Berlin,
Berlin 10587, Germany
e-mail: uhlmann@iwf.tu-berlin.de

Bernd Peukert

Institute for Machine Tools and
Factory Management,
Technische Universität Berlin,
Berlin 10587, Germany
e-mail: peukert@iwf.tu-berlin.de

Simon Thom

Institute for Machine Tools and
Factory Management,
Technische Universität Berlin,
Berlin 10587, Germany
e-mail: thom@iwf.tu-berlin.de

Lukas Prasol

Institute for Machine Tools and
Factory Management,
Technische Universität Berlin,
Berlin 10587, Germany
e-mail: prasol@iwf.tu-berlin.de

Paul Fürstmann

Institute for Machine Tools and
Factory Management,
Technische Universität Berlin,
Berlin 10587, Germany
e-mail: paul.fuerstmann@gmx.de

Fiona Sammler

Institute for Machine Tools and
Factory Management,
Technische Universität Berlin,
Berlin 10587, Germany
e-mail: fiona.sammler@iwf.tu-berlin.de

Sebastian Richarz

Institute for Machine Tools and
Factory Management,
Technische Universität Berlin,
Berlin 10587, Germany
e-mail: richarz@iwf.tu-berlin.de

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MANUFACTURING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. Manuscript received August 17, 2016; final manuscript received September 16, 2016; published online November 21, 2016. Editor: Y. Lawrence Yao.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 139(5), 051009 (Nov 21, 2016) (7 pages) Paper No: MANU-16-1447; doi: 10.1115/1.4034850 History: Received August 17, 2016; Revised September 16, 2016

The manufacturing industry contributes over 19% to the world's greenhouse gas emissions (U.S. Energy Information Administration, 2008, “Rep: Annual Energy Review 2008,” Report No. DOE/EIA-0384; Diaz et al., 2010, “Environmental Analysis of Milling Machine Tool Use in Various Manufacturing Environments,” 2010 IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology.) and 31% of the total energy consumed annually in the U.S. (Herzog, T., 2005, “World Greenhouse Gas Emissions in 2005,” World Resources Institute, Washington, DC 2; Diaz et al., 2010, “Environmental Analysis of Milling Machine Tool Use in Various Manufacturing Environments,” 2010 IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology.). There is therefore an increasing demand for sustainable solutions for the production technology industry. At the Technische Universitat (TU) Berlin, Germany, a collaborative research center (CRC) is focusing on new solutions for the sustainable machining of high performance alloys, with developments from machine tool frames to cutting tool technology being undertaken. An innovative machine tool concept with a modular frame, which allows a high level of flexibility, has been developed. Furthermore, add-on upgrading systems for older machine tools, which are particularly relevant for developing countries, have been developed. These systems allow the accuracy of outdated machine tools to be increased, thus making the machine tools comparable to modern systems. Finally the cutting process also requires solutions for dry machining, as the use of cooling lubricant is environmentally damaging and a significant cost contributor in machining processes. Two solutions are being developed at the TU Berlin: an internally cooled cutting tool and a heating concept for ceramic tools to allow dry machining of high temperature alloys, for example, for the aerospace industry.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Technology architecture of the LEG2O framework

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Fig. 2

Lightweight optimized passive modules; (a) half hexagon (7.4 kg) and (b) full hexagon (12.5 kg)

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Fig. 3

Concept of the smart modules equipped with wireless sensor nodes is used to separate the multiple sentences

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Fig. 4

Control structure of the active module

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Fig. 5

Test setup of upgraded milling machine FP4NC, deckel

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Fig. 6

Error compensation table (clamping plate removed)

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Fig. 7

Positioning deviations of the x-axis

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Fig. 8

Structural optimized internally cooled turning tool with microcooling device and thin cutting insert, the arrows indicating the cooling fluid flow. 1 clamping finger, 2 clamping plate, 3 cutting insert, 4 evaporator top, 5 evaporator bottom, 6 structural optimized closed loop cooled tool holder, 7 mixing chamber with secondary outlet, 8 main coolant outlet, and 9 coolant inlet.

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Fig. 9

Crater wear rate for different cooling approaches

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Fig. 10

Specific energy consumption per removed material for different cutting processes with regard to speed of cut and different cooling approaches

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Fig. 11

Concept of preheated ceramic tool to decrease thermal load alteration on the tool tip and thus avoid crack generation

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Fig. 12

Increased wear resistance of a ceramic tool when the rake face was heated

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