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Research Papers

Residual Winding Stresses Due to Spatial Web Thickness Variation

[+] Author and Article Information
J. K. Good

Fellow ASME
School of Mechanical
and Aerospace Engineering,
Oklahoma State University,
Engineering North 218,
Stillwater, OK 74078
e-mail: james.k.good@okstate.edu

C. Mollamahmutoglu

Department of Civil Engineering,
University of Yildiz,
Davutpaşa Kampüsü,
Esenler, İstanbul 34220, Turkey
e-mail: cagri.mollamahmutoglu@gmail.com

R. Markum

School of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
Oklahoma State University,
Engineering North 218,
Stillwater, OK 74078
e-mail: ron.markum@okstate.edu

J. W. Gale

Rockline Industries,
4006 Clark Avenue,
Springdale, AR 72762
e-mail: gale.jared@gmail.com

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received May 6, 2016; final manuscript received August 11, 2016; published online October 3, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Donggang Yao.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 139(3), 031003 (Oct 03, 2016) (12 pages) Paper No: MANU-16-1262; doi: 10.1115/1.4034593 History: Received May 06, 2016; Revised August 11, 2016

At the end of roll-to-roll (R2R) manufacturing process machines, the web substrate must be wound into rolls. Winding is the only means known to store and protect vast lengths of very thin webs for subsequent processing. Web thickness variation in wound rolls is a root cause of large manufacturing loss due to residual stress-related defects. Minute thickness variations down the length and across the web width can induce large residual stress variations and defects within the roll. Winding models allow the exploration of winding residual stresses whose variation has been affected by web thickness or coating imperfections. Knowledge of these stresses is used to mitigate manufacturing defects. Spot web thickness sensors are employed in R2R process lines that scan over the web width while the web is moving downstream through the process machine. Spatially, this provides a measure of web thickness in a zig-zag pattern. During manufacturing, the thickness variation is used as a control feedback parameter to manipulate a forming or coating die lip to reduce the web or coated web thickness variation. The thickness variation acceptable in process may be very different than that which is acceptable based on the residual stresses in the wound roll. It will be determined whether the thickness test data captured spatially for process feedback are sufficient to characterize the residual stresses in the wound roll. A winding model will be developed and verified that is used to characterize these residual stresses.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

A measured full thickness map of a PET web, nominally 76 μm in thickness

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Fig. 2

(a) 60 zig-zag scans through full data set. Interpolated thickness from (b) 60 scans, (c) 30 scans, and (d) 10 scans.

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Fig. 3

(a) Web thickness variation in sector 4 and (b) average layer thickness in sector 4

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Fig. 4

Modeling of wound rolls with axisymmetric finite elements

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Fig. 5

Actual r–z and natural η–ξ coordinates for an axisymmetric finite element

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Fig. 6

The outer lap in a winding model

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Fig. 7

(a) Core pressure instrument, (b) switchable sector output, (c) instrumented rings, (d) bridge balance, and (e) outer layer profilometer

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Fig. 8

Core pressure comparison using thickness input: (a) averaged by layer and (b) averaged for entire sector

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Fig. 9

Outer lap radius comparison using thickness input: (a) averaged by layer and (b) averaged for entire sector

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Fig. 10

Pressure in sector 14 with web thickness input: (a) averaged by layer and (b) averaged for entire sector

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Fig. 11

Tangential stress in sector 14 with web thickness input: (a) averaged by layer and (b) averaged for entire sector

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Fig. 12

Residual winding stresses using the full thickness data averaged by layer for model input: (a) pressure, (b) tangential, (c) axial z, and (d) shearing stresses in the rz plane

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