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Research Papers

Energy Consumption Modeling and Analyses in Automotive Manufacturing Plant

[+] Author and Article Information
Lujia Feng

Automotive Engineering Department,
Clemson University,
4 Research Drive Cubicle #31,
Greenville, SC 29607
e-mail: lujiaf@g.clemson.edu

Laine Mears

Automotive Engineering Department,
Clemson University,
4 Research Drive Room 343,
Greenville, SC 29607
e-mail: mears@clemson.edu

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received December 1, 2015; final manuscript received July 15, 2016; published online August 10, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Jorge Arinez.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 138(10), 101005 (Aug 10, 2016) (11 pages) Paper No: MANU-15-1622; doi: 10.1115/1.4034302 History: Received December 01, 2015; Revised July 15, 2016

Manufacturing plants energy consumption accounts for a large share in world energy usage. Energy consumption modeling and analyses are widely studied to understand how and where the energy is used inside of the plants. However, a systematic energy modeling approach is seldom studied to describe the holistic energy in the plants. Especially using layers of models to share information and guide the next step modeling is rarely studied. In this paper, a manufacturing system temporal and organizational framework was used to guide the systematic energy modeling approach. Various levels of models were established and tested in an automotive manufacturing plant to illustrate how the approach can be implemented. A detail paint spray booth air unit was described to demonstrate how to investigate the most sensitive variables in affecting energy consumption. While considering the current plant metering status, the proposed approach is advanced in information sharing and improvement suggestion determination.

Copyright © 2016 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Energy system in temporal framework (after Ref. [6])

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Fig. 2

Energy system in special/spanning organizational framework (after Ref. [7])

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Fig. 3

Flowchart of energy modeling in plant

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Fig. 4

Energy flow sketch in studied automotive manufacturing plant

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Fig. 5

Framework-guided systematic approach scheme of studied case

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Fig. 6

Purchased natural gas (a), landfill gas (b), and electricity (normalized) (c)

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Fig. 7

Fitted natural gas (a), landfill gas (b), and electricity (normalized) (c)

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Fig. 8

New year data with fitted model—natural gas example

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Fig. 9

Regression model: (a) natural gas and (b) electricity

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Fig. 10

Energy distribution in energy forms

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Fig. 11

Energy distribution to department

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Fig. 12

Painting booth air supply flow sketch

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Fig. 13

Energy supply and demand models

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Fig. 14

Action and knowledge input flow chart

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Fig. 15

Air supply energy consumption flow chart

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Fig. 16

Heat exchanger sketch

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Fig. 17

Water heat capacity and fitted polynomial plot

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Fig. 18

Model inputs and outputs sketch

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Fig. 19

Baseline heating validation

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Fig. 20

Baseline cooling validation

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Fig. 21

Temperature set point adjustment study (heating)

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Fig. 22

Temperature set point adjustment study (cooling)

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