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Research Papers

Theoretical and Experimental Investigation on Inclined Ultrasonic Elliptical Vibration Cutting of Alumina Ceramics

[+] Author and Article Information
Wu-Le Zhu

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Northwestern University,
2145 Sheridan Road,
Evanston, IL 60208;
The State Key Lab of Fluid Power
Transmission and Control,
Zhejiang University,
Hangzhou 310027, China
e-mail: wule5033@gmail.com

Yu He

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Northwestern University,
2145 Sheridan Road,
Evanston, IL 60208
e-mail: iainyuhe@hotmail.com

Kornel F. Ehmann

Fellow ASME
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Northwestern University,
2145 Sheridan Road,
Evanston, IL 60208
e-mail: k-ehmann@northwestern.edu

Antonio J. Sánchez Egea

Departament d′Enginyeria Mecánica,
Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya,
Balaguer Vilanova i la Geltrú. 08800, Spain
e-mail: antonio.egea@upc.edu

Xinwei Wang

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Northwestern University,
2145 Sheridan Road,
Evanston, IL 60208
e-mail: williamwxwz@gmail.com

Bing-Feng Ju

The State Key Lab of Fluid
Power Transmission and Control,
Zhejiang University,
Hangzhou 310027, China
e-mail: mbfju@zju.edu.cn

Zhiwei Zhu

State Key Laboratory of Ultra-Precision Machining Technology,
Department of Industrial
and Systems Engineering,
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University,
Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR 999077, China
e-mail: 13901640r@connect.polyu.hk

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received October 30, 2015; final manuscript received May 5, 2016; published online August 8, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Z. J. Pei.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 138(12), 121011 (Aug 08, 2016) (11 pages) Paper No: MANU-15-1542; doi: 10.1115/1.4033605 History: Received October 30, 2015; Revised May 05, 2016

Alumina (Al2O3) is an extremely hard and brittle ceramic that is usually used as an abrasive or a cutting tool insert in manufacturing. However, its growing applications in industrial products make it necessary to conduct a study of the machinability of alumina themselves with a cost-effective and flexible method, rather than conventional diamond grinding or laser-assisted processing methods. In this paper, polycrystalline diamond tools are used to investigate the machining of nonporous pure alumina by applying an inclined ultrasonic elliptical vibration cutting (IUEVC) method. First, a theoretical analysis is presented to study the effects of the machining parameters on cutting performances during raster cutting procedures from the prospective of the material removal rate (MRR), tool-chip contact area, cutting edge angle, etc. Then, experiments are carried out to investigate the cutting forces and the areal surface roughness (Sa) in connection with the theoretically established relationships. The results show that the cutting forces are remarkably reduced, by up to more than 90%, and that the machined surface finish is also improved compared with conventional methods.

Copyright © 2016 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

The 3D model of the IUEVC tool

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Fig. 2

(1) The first cutting-direction mode at 11.73 kHz, (2) The second cutting-direction mode at 27.72 kHz, (3) The first DOC-direction mode at 27.99 kHz

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Fig. 3

The generated inclined elliptical vibration locus

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Fig. 4

The principle of operation of the IUEVC

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Fig. 5

Comparison between IUEVC and UEVC methods

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Fig. 6

Illustration of IUEVC alumina in raster cutting procedure

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Fig. 7

(a) The effect of feed intervals, nominal DOC, and tool nose radius on cutting mechanics in the YZ plane; (b) Cutting mechanics for an arbitrary cutting point in the XZ plane for the IUEVC method

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Fig. 8

The theoretical relationship between MMR and (a) cutting speed and DOC (fr = 10 μm, Rn = 200 μm), (b) feed interval and tool radius (DOC = 4 μm, vc = 10 mm/s)

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Fig. 9

The schematic view of the experimental setup

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Fig. 10

The relationship between cutting force components and cutting lines in feed direction at different cutting speeds. (a) Thrust force and (b) tangential force (ap = 4 μm, fr = 10 μm, Rn = 200 μm).

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Fig. 11

The effect of machining parameters on cutting forces. (a) The effect of cutting speeds (ap = 4 μm, fr = 10 μm, Rn = 200 μm), (b) the effect of DOCs (vc = 10 mm/s, fr = 10 μm, Rn = 200 μm), and (c) the effect of feed intervals (vc = 10 mm/s, ap = 4 μm, Rn = 200 μm).

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Fig. 12

The effect of machining parameters on surface roughness (Sa). (a) the effect of cutting speeds (ap = 4 μm, fr = 10 μm, Rn = 200 μm), (b) the effect of DOCs (vc = 10 mm/s, fr = 10 μm, Rn = 200 μm), and (c) the effect of feed intervals (vc = 10 mm/s, ap = 4 μm, Rn = 200 μm).

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Fig. 13

The effect of tool nose radius on (a) cutting forces, (b) surface roughness (vc = 10 mm/s, ap = 4 μm, fr = 20 μm)

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Fig. 14

Comparison between IUEVC and CC methods in terms of (a) thrust force and (b) tangential force (vc = 5 mm/s, ap = 4 μm, fr = 10 μm, Rn = 200 μm)

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Fig. 15

The numeric comparison between CC and IUEVC methods regarding thrust force, tangential force, surface roughness, and profile roughness. (vc = 5 mm/s, ap = 4 μm, fr = 10 μm, Rn = 200 μm).

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