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Technical Brief

A Study on Enhancing the Performance of Thermally Autofrettaged Cylinder Through Shrink-Fitting

[+] Author and Article Information
S. M. Kamal

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology,
Guwahati 781 039, India

U. S. Dixit

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology,
Guwahati 781 039, India
e-mail: uday@iitg.ac.in

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received September 21, 2015; final manuscript received March 15, 2016; published online June 20, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Matteo Strano.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 138(9), 094501 (Jun 20, 2016) (5 pages) Paper No: MANU-15-1484; doi: 10.1115/1.4033083 History: Received September 21, 2015; Revised March 15, 2016

Thick-walled cylinders are subjected to autofrettage process to increase their pressure carrying capacity and fatigue lifetime. The thermal autofrettage process is a potential process that can generate beneficial compressive thermal residual stresses at and around the inner radius of the cylinder by employing a radial temperature difference across its wall thickness. This enables the thermally autofrettaged cylinder to withstand more pressure than a nonautofrettaged one. However, due to the limitation on the maximum temperature that the cylinder can be subjected to without the change of material properties, the maximum increase of pressure carrying capacity is also limited by thermal autofrettage. In this work, a methodology is proposed for enhancing the pressure carrying capacity of the thermally autofrettaged cylinder through shrink-fit. This also keeps the main cylinder under compression, thus improving its fatigue strength. The analysis of thermal autofrettage is based on the assumptions of constant axial strain and Tresca yield criterion.

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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Geometry of the compound cylinder with thermally autofrettaged inner cylinder

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Residual stress distribution in the compound cylinder where the inner cylinder is thermally autofrettaged

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Overall stress distribution in the pressurized compound cylinder (for p = 159.40 MPa) where the inner cylinder is thermally autofrettaged

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Residual stress distribution in the compound cylinder where the inner cylinder is hydraulically autofrettaged

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Overall stress distribution in the repressurized compound cylinder for (p = 192.18 MPa) where the inner cylinder is hydraulically autofrettaged

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