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Technical Brief

Reducing Geometrical, Physical, and Chemical Constraints in Surface Integrity of High-Performance Stainless Steel Components by Surface Modification

[+] Author and Article Information
M. K. Lei

Surface Engineering Laboratory,
School of Materials Science and Engineering,
Dalian University of Technology,
Dalian 116024, China
e-mail: mklei@dlut.edu.cn

X. P. Zhu

Surface Engineering Laboratory,
School of Materials Science and Engineering,
Dalian University of Technology,
Dalian 116024, China

D. M. Guo

Key Laboratory for Precision and Non-Traditional
Machining of the Ministry of Education,
Dalian University of Technology,
Dalian 116024, China
e-mail: guodm@dlut.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MANUFACTURING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. Manuscript received May 7, 2015; final manuscript received July 25, 2015; published online October 27, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Y. B. Guo.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 138(4), 044501 (Oct 27, 2015) (6 pages) Paper No: MANU-15-1213; doi: 10.1115/1.4031191 History: Received May 07, 2015; Revised July 25, 2015

High-performance manufacturing is difficult to perform using conventional materials removal processes since a surface integrity demand for high-performance components is strongly restricted by intrinsic interactions between the geometrical feature of components and the physical and chemical characteristics of the base material. Surface modification techniques based on known processing loads, including mechanical, thermomechanical, and thermochemical loads, are utilized for manufacturing the Fe–Cr–Ni austenitic stainless steel components. The geometrical feature and the physical and chemical characteristics as well as the controllable interactions between them are identified in the surface integrity of the surface-modified components by creating new surface layers coupled with base material. The effective surface states control, including surface morphology, microhardness, and residual stress, leads to surface integrity improvement by reducing geometrical, physical, and chemical constraints from base materials, otherwise unobtainable merely using conventional materials removal manufacturing. The fatigue life of the surface-modified components is significantly increased due to the improved surface integrity. It is proposed that high surface integrity possesses a pivotal role between the functional properties of components and their geometrical feature and materials characteristics for the high-performance manufacturing.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

A summary of typical surface modification techniques based on the processing loads

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Fig. 2

Typical surface morphology of AISI 304 and AISI 316 L austenitic stainless steels before and after UIT, IBSP, and PSN treatments, respectively

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Fig. 3

Residual stress-depth profiles of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel before and after UIT surface modification

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Fig. 4

Residual stresses in the surface layer of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steels with different modified layer thicknesses after PSN surface modification

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Fig. 5

S–N curves of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel rods before and after UIT treatment, tested on a PQ-6 rotation bending fatigue tester at a frequency of 50 Hz, where the insert image shows tested samples of a full length of 226 mm with a 10-mm-diameter central working segment of 8 mm length

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Fig. 6

Fatigue strength of IBSP-treated AISI 316 L austenitic stainless steels under tension–tension mode of a maximal cyclic load of 480 MPa with stress ratio of 0.1 at a sine frequency of 20 Hz, where the insert image shows tested samples with a full length of 72 mm and thickness of 1.5 mm with a working segment of 15 mm length and 5 mm width

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Fig. 7

S–N curves of PSN-treated AISI 304 stainless steels tested in borate buffer solution of a pH value of 8.4 with loading stress ratio of −1 at a sine frequency of 45 Hz, where the insert image shows tested samples with a full length of 81 mm with a 4-mm-diameter central working segment of 15 mm length

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Fig. 8

The body-centered tetrahedron relation for high-performance manufacturing, illustrating the importance of high surface integrity relative to high performance of components through controllable interaction between geometrical feature and physical and chemical characteristics

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