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Research Papers

Analysis of Cohesive Microsized Particle Packing Structure Using History-Dependent Contact Models

[+] Author and Article Information
Raihan Tayeb, Xin Dou, Yijin Mao

Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
University of Missouri,
Columbia, MO 65211

Yuwen Zhang

Fellow ASME
Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
University of Missouri,
Columbia, MO 65211
e-mail: zhangyu@missouri.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MANUFACTURING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. Manuscript received February 16, 2015; final manuscript received July 28, 2015; published online October 27, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Z. J. Pei.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 138(4), 041005 (Oct 27, 2015) (11 pages) Paper No: MANU-15-1085; doi: 10.1115/1.4031246 History: Received February 16, 2015; Revised July 28, 2015

Granular packing structures of cohesive microsized particles with different sizes and size distributions, including monosized, uniform, and Gaussian distribution, are investigated by using two different history dependent contact models with discrete element method (DEM). The simulation is carried out in the framework of liggghts, which is a DEM simulation package extended based on branch of granular package of widely used open-source code LAMMPS. Contact force caused by translation and rotation, frictional and damping forces due to collision with other particles or container boundaries, cohesive force, van der Waals force, and gravity is considered. The radial distribution functions (RDFs), force distributions, porosities, and coordination numbers under cohesive and noncohesive conditions are reported. The results indicate that particle size and size distributions have great influences on the packing density for particle packing under cohesive effect: particles with Gaussian distribution have the lowest packing density, followed by the particles with uniform distribution; the particles with monosized distribution have the highest packing density. It is also found that cohesive effect to the system does not significantly affect the coordination number that mainly depends on the particle size and size distribution. Although the magnitude of net force distribution is different, the results for porosity, coordination number, and mean value of magnitude of net force do not vary significantly between the two contact models.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Initial and final structure for Gaussian particles from the modified Gran–Hertz–History model with cohesion: (a) particles at t = 1 × 10−8 s and (b) particles at t = 0.2 s

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Fig. 2

Initial and final packing structure for monosized particles from the modified Gran–Hertz–History model with cohesion: (a) particles at t = 1 × 10−8 s and (b) particles at t = 0.2 s

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Fig. 3

Initial and final packing structure for uniform size particles from modified Gran–Hertz–History with cohesion: (a) particles at t = 1 × 10−8 s and (b) particles at t = 0.2 s

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Fig. 4

Initial and final structure for Gaussian particles fromGran–Hooke–History model with cohesion: (a) particles at t = 1 × 10−8 s and (b) particles at t = 0.2 s

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Fig. 5

Effect of porosity with particle size and distribution: (a)the modified Gran–Hertz–History model and (b) Gran–Hooke–History model

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Fig. 6

Effect of coordination number with particle size and distribution: (a) the modified Gran–Hertz–History model and (b) Gran–Hooke–History model

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Fig. 7

RDF for particles with 75 μm radius: (a) the modified Gran–Hertz–History with cohesion, (b) the modified Gran–Hertz–History without cohesion, (c) Gran–Hooke–History with cohesion, and (d) Gran–Hooke–History without cohesion

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Fig. 8

RDF for particles with 85 μm radius: (a) the modified Gran–Hertz–History with cohesion, (b) the modified Gran–Hertz–History without cohesion, (c) Gran–Hooke–History with cohesion, and (d) Gran–Hooke–History without cohesion

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Fig. 9

RDF for particles with 100 μm radius: (a) the modified Gran–Hertz–History with cohesion, (b) the modified Gran–Hertz–History without cohesion, (c) Gran–Hooke–History with cohesion, and (d) Gran–Hooke–History without cohesion

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Fig. 10

RDF for particles with 110 μm radius: (a) the modified Gran–Hertz–History with cohesion, (b) the modified Gran–Hertz–History without cohesion, (c) Gran–Hooke–History with cohesion, and (d) Gran–Hooke–History without cohesion

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Fig. 11

RDF for particles with 120 μm radius: (a) the modified Gran–Hertz–History with cohesion, (b) the modified Gran–Hertz–History without cohesion, (c) Gran–Hooke–History with cohesion, and (d) Gran–Hooke–History without cohesion

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Fig. 12

Force distribution for particles with 75 μm radius and Gaussian distribution: (a) the modified Gran–Hertz–History with cohesion, (b) the modified Gran–Hertz–History without cohesion, (c) Gran–Hooke–History with cohesion, and (d) Gran–Hooke–History without cohesion

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Fig. 13

Force distribution for particles with 75 μm radius and monosize distribution: (a) the modified Gran–Hertz–History with cohesion, (b) the modified Gran–Hertz–History without cohesion, (c) Gran–Hooke–History with cohesion, and (d) Gran–Hooke–History without cohesion

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Fig. 14

Force distribution for particles with 75 μm radius and uniform distribution: (a) the modified Gran–Hertz–History with cohesion, (b) the modified Gran–Hertz–History without cohesion, (c) Gran–Hooke–History with cohesion, and (d) Gran–Hooke–History without cohesion

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