0
Research Papers

Dynamic Recrystallization of Al Alloy 7075 in Turning

[+] Author and Article Information
A. Tabei

G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering,
Georgia Institute of Technology,
Atlanta, GA 30318

D. S. Shih

Boeing Research and Technology,
St. Louis, MO

H. Garmestani

School of Materials Science and Engineering,
Georgia Institute of Technology,
Atlanta, GA

S. Y. Liang

G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering,
Georgia Institute of Technology,
Atlanta, GA 30318
e-mail: steven.liang@me.gatech.edu

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received August 9, 2015; final manuscript received February 6, 2016; published online March 9, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Guillaume Fromentin.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 138(7), 071010 (Mar 09, 2016) (7 pages) Paper No: MANU-15-1397; doi: 10.1115/1.4032807 History: Received August 09, 2015; Revised February 06, 2016

This work investigates the effects of turning process parameters on recrystallization behavior in Al alloy 7075. To realize this purpose, samples were machined under different cutting speeds and material feed rates at two extreme levels. Microscopy imaging reveals that activation of dynamic recrystallization or grain growth depends on the combination of applied cutting parameters. Increasing the cutting speed intensifies recrystallization, while the feed rate governs the grain growth. Adjusting the cutting parameters enables one to obtain a desired average grain size below the machined surface, up to a ∼180 μm depth. The average grain size of the initial material was 31.6 μm. The imposed processing parameters successfully yielded average grain sizes in the range from 19 to 44 μm. Additionally, a computational framework work consisting of finite-element analysis (FEA) coupled with kinetic-based modeling of recrystallization was developed, which is capable of following the trend of change in the average grain size and acceptably predicts the evolved average grain size.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2016 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

(a) The temperature and (b) the maximum equivalent strain and strain rate profiles in machining at the low feed rate and the high cutting speed

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

The FE-based average grain size in machining at the low feed rate and the high cutting speed

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Schematic of (a) the machining process and (b) the machined surface and the experimentally characterized region

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

(a) The microstructure and (b) the corresponding image quality maps of the sample machined at the low feed rate and the high cutting speed

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

The grain size distribution of the as-received material

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Temperature profile as a function of cutting speed

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

(a) The microstructure and (b) the corresponding image quality maps of the sample machined at the high feed rate and the low cutting speed

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

(a) The microstructure and (b) the corresponding image quality maps of the sample machined at the high feed rate and the high cutting speed

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

The FE-based average grain size in machining at the high feed rate and the high cutting speed

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

(a) The microstructure and (b) the corresponding image quality maps of the as-received AA 7075

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In