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Research Papers

Curing-Induced Debonding and Its Influence on Strength of Adhesively Bonded Joints of Dissimilar Materials

[+] Author and Article Information
XiaoBo Zhu

State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System
and Vibration,
Shanghai Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacture for Thin-Walled Structures,
School of Mechanical Engineering,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China

YongBing Li

Professor
State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System
and Vibration,
Shanghai Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacture for Thin-Walled Structures,
School of Mechanical Engineering,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: yongbinglee@sjtu.edu.cn

Jun Ni

Professor
College of Engineering,
University of Michigan,
1023 H. H. Dow Building,
2350 Hayward Street,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109

XinMin Lai

Professor
State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System
and Vibration,
Shanghai Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacture for Thin-Walled Structures,
School of Mechanical Engineering,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received April 29, 2015; final manuscript received November 1, 2015; published online January 6, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Wayne Cai.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 138(6), 061005 (Jan 06, 2016) (10 pages) Paper No: MANU-15-1204; doi: 10.1115/1.4032081 History: Received April 29, 2015; Revised November 01, 2015

Adhesive bonding is thought to be a suitable method for joining dissimilar materials, such as aluminum to steel in multimaterial car-body manufacturing, but when it is combined with other joining methods, such as spot welding or self-piercing riveting, curing the adhesive at elevated temperature induces problems, such as distortion and adhesive debond. In this study, the effects of debonds were investigated by examining load–displacement curve and dissipated energy in lap-shear and peeling tests of artificially debonded joints. The results showed that the debonds caused by curing are of dog-bone type or stripe failure type, and both of them have little influence on the peel strength, but have strong influence on the shear strength and energy absorption. For the lap-shear specimens, the debonds reduce the bonding area, leading to the reduction in maximum shear force. For the double cantilever beam specimens, the debonds produce little influence on maximum peeling force but obvious variations in the peeling load curve. The energy absorption values are inversely proportional to the debonds due to the reduction in bonding area. The overall results from this research facilitate the understanding of the debonding mechanism caused by curing-induced distortion by revealing two types of debond patterns in dissimilar material bonding joints and their influences on joint performance.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Configuration of the specimens: (a) lap-shear specimens for shear test and (b) double cantilever beam specimens for peel test (dimension in millimeter)

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Fig. 2

Geometry of bond area in the specimens with artificial debonds: (a) stripe failure type and (b) dog-bone type for lap-shear test and (c) stripe failure type and (d) dog-bone type for DCB peel test (dimension in millimeter, sketch not to scale)

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Fig. 3

Equipment and fixtures used: (a) lap-shear test and (b) peel test

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Fig. 4

Debond and fractography of lap-shear specimens of combinations 1 and 2: (a) side view of a typical debonded specimen after curing, (b) fractography of sample bonded with adhesive A, and (c) fractography of sample bonded with adhesive B

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Fig. 5

Lap-shear testing results of combinations 4–6 with adhesive A stripe debond. Load–displacement curves of (a) combination 4, (b) combination 5, (c) combination 6, and (d)–(f) corresponding energy absorption values of different specimens calculated from the results of (a)–(c).

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Fig. 6

The fracture surfaces of (a) combination 4, (b) combination 5, and (c) combination 6 after lap-shear test

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Fig. 7

Load–displacement curves of (a) combination 7 with adhesive A dog-bone type debond, (b) energy absorption versus displacement based on the load curves of (a), and (c) fracture surface of combination 7 under 1 m/min loading speed

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Fig. 8

Load–displacement curves of (a) combination 5 with adhesive A stripe-type debond and (b) energy absorption versus displacement based on the load curves of (a). The loading speed is 100 mm/min.

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Fig. 9

Load–displacement curves of (a) combination 7 with adhesive A dog-bone type debond under 100 mm/min loading speed, (b) energy absorption versus displacement based on the load curves of (a), and (c) fracture surface of combination 9 under 100 mm/min loading speed

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Fig. 10

Load–displacement curves with stripe-failure-type artificial debonds: (a) combination 8, (b) combination 9, (c) combination 10, and (d)–(f) corresponding energy absorption values of different specimens calculated from the results of (a)–(c)

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Fig. 11

Load–displacement curves and corresponding dissipated energy values with dog-bone-type artificial debonds. (a) Combination 11, with a well-bonded width of 5 mm in the central part and (b) combination 12, with a well-bonded width of 15 mm in the central part. ((c) and (d)) Calculated energy absorption values of (a) and (b), respectively.

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Fig. 12

Load–displacement curves and corresponding dissipated energy values with stripe-type artificial debond using combination 9 specimens under loading speed 100 mm/min. (a) Load–displacement curves and (b) energy absorption.

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Fig. 13

Load–displacement curves and corresponding dissipated energy values with stripe-type artificial debond using combination 11 specimens under loading speed 100 mm/min. (a) Load–displacement curve and (b) energy absorption.

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