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Research Papers: JOINING

Effect of Thermal Assistance on the Joint Quality of Al6063-T5A During Flow Drill Screwdriving

[+] Author and Article Information
Jamie D. Skovron

Mem. ASME
Department of Automotive Engineering,
Clemson University International Center
for Automotive Research,
4 Research Drive,
Greenville, SC 29607
e-mail: JSkovro@clemson.edu

R. Rohan Prasad

Department of Automotive Engineering,
Clemson University International Center
for Automotive Research,
4 Research Drive,
Greenville, SC 29607
e-mail: Rohanrp@iitrpr.ac.in

Durul Ulutan

Department of Automotive Engineering,
Clemson University International Center
for Automotive Research,
4 Research Drive,
Greenville, SC 29607
e-mail: du005@bucknell.edu

Laine Mears

Department of Automotive Engineering,
Clemson University International Center
for Automotive Research,
4 Research Drive,
Greenville, SC 29607
e-mail: Mears@clemson.edu

Duane Detwiler

Honda R&D Americas,
21001 State Route 739,
Raymond, OH 43067
e-mail: Ddetwiler@oh.hra.com

Daniel Paolini

Honda R&D Americas,
21001 State Route 739,
Raymond, OH 43067
e-mail: DPaolini@oh.hra.com

Boris Baeumler

DEPRAG, Inc.,
640 Hembry Street,
Lewisville, TX 75057
e-mail: B.baeumler@depragusa.com

Laurence Claus

EJOT® GmbH,
Untere Bienhecke 16,
Bad Laasphe D57334, Germany
e-mail: lsclaus@sbcglobal.net

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MANUFACTURING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. Manuscript received December 22, 2014; final manuscript received August 4, 2015; published online September 4, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Edmund Chu.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 137(5), 051019 (Sep 04, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: MANU-14-1706; doi: 10.1115/1.4031242 History: Received December 22, 2014; Revised August 04, 2015

An increase in fuel economy standards has affected automakers' decision toward designing lightweight vehicles and therefore transitioning from steel-based bodies to ones predominantly composed of aluminum. An introduction to lightweight materials couples that of lightweight joining with a thermomechanical process, flow drill screwdriving (FDS). This process is favored in terms of robustness, short installation time, and only requiring access to one side. The current limitation with FDS occurs with the imposed 8.3 N·m maximum installation torque standardized for M5 self-tapping screws. Warm forming of aluminum has been shown to increase ductility and formability of the material, and thus a reduction in installation torque is sought after along with an expected decrease in process time. In this study, different preprocess material temperatures of Al6063-T5A are studied to determine the effect of material temperature on the process time, installation torque, and other joint measurables. As a result, with the thermal assistance, a reduction in the process time up to 52% and installation torque by 20% was attained. The increase in preprocess material temperature did not affect the hardness of the material outside of the minimal heat-affected zone, as the maximum preprocess material temperature did not exceed the tempering temperature.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Six steps of the FDS process

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Fig. 2

Heat generation nomenclature

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Fig. 3

Heat dissipation nomenclature

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Fig. 4

DEPRAG FFS machine

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Fig. 5

Experimental setup

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Fig. 6

Location of measurement for material sheet separation

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Fig. 7

Effect of induced temperature on process time

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Fig. 8

Effect on installation torque

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Fig. 9

Effect on max. installation torque

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Fig. 10

Cross sections of (a) 23 °C, (b) 143 °C, and (c) 247 °C samples

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Fig. 11

Decrease in sheet separation with increase in temperature

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Fig. 12

Effect on top sheet hardness

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Fig. 13

Effect on bottom sheet hardness

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Fig. 14

Effect on max. shear load

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Fig. 15

Effect on cross-tension strength

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