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Research Papers: JOINING

Influence of Kinematics During Roller Clinching on Joint Properties

[+] Author and Article Information
Maria Weiss

Institute of Metal Forming and Casting,
Walther-Meissner-Strasse 4,
Garching 85748, Germany
e-mail: maria.weiss@utg.de

Wolfram Volk

Institute of Metal Forming and Casting,
Walther-Meissner-Strasse 4,
Garching 85748, Germany
e-mail: wolfram.volk@utg.de

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MANUFACTURING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. Manuscript received December 17, 2014; final manuscript received May 15, 2015; published online September 4, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Yannis Korkolis.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 137(5), 051016 (Sep 04, 2015) (9 pages) Paper No: MANU-14-1682; doi: 10.1115/1.4030671 History: Received December 17, 2014

Roller clinching is an effective way to join continuous sheet metal components. In contrast to translational clinching, joining with rotational tool movement is a continuous process in which the semifinished parts can be fed through the joining device at a constant high velocity without stopping and accelerating. Because of the special kinematics, which differs from translational clinching, the clinchpoint reveals an asymmetric joint formation. This paper deals with the influence of different rolling radii of the tools and stripping forces on the clinchpoint formation and the resulting mechanical joint properties. Experiments are performed to determine tensile and shear strengths of the rotational clinchpoints. They are compared to the properties of translational clinchpoints. Furthermore, the kinematic mechanisms during roller clinching influencing the clinchpoint geometry are identified.

Copyright © 2015 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Definition of mechanical load mechanisms depending on geometrical formation of the conventional and rotational clinchpoints

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Fig. 2

Overlaid horizontal tool movement during the different process phases of roller clinching

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Fig. 3

Lock parameters of a clinchpoint

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Fig. 4

Schematic of the test rig including relevant geometric parameters (see Ref. [11])

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Fig. 5

Tool setup for roller clinching

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Fig. 6

Tool setup for conventional clinching

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Fig. 7

Design of experiments

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Fig. 8

Definition of geometrical properties of a roller clinched joint

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Fig. 9

3D microscope scans of the outer geometry of the rotational clinchpoints (punch retraction side is situated on the left side, punch impact side on the right side) depending on the experimental parameters compared to conventional joints

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Fig. 10

Polished micrograph sections of rotational clinchpoints along feed direction (punch retraction side is situated on the left side, punch impact side on the right side) compared to conventional clinchpoints

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Fig. 11

Undercut and neck thickness of the rotational clinchpoints along feed direction depending on experimental parameters compared to the conventional (conv.) joints

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Fig. 12

Outer flank angles of the rotational clinchpoints along feed direction depending on experimental parameters compared to the conventional (conv.) joints

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Fig. 13

Trajectories of punch and die during roller clinching

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Fig. 14

Polished micrograph sections of rotational clinchpoints perpendicular to the feed direction compared to conventional clinchpoints

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Fig. 15

Essential geometrical properties of the cross sections perpendicular to the feed direction depending on experimental parameters compared to conventional clinchpoints

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Fig. 16

Tensile strength and corresponding standard deviations compared to the tensile strength of the reference experiments with conventional clinchpoints

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Fig. 17

Shear strength in 0 deg direction and corresponding standard deviations compared to the shear strength of the reference experiments with conventional clinchpoints

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Fig. 18

Failure behavior under shear load in 0 deg direction

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Fig. 19

Shear strength in 180 deg direction and corresponding standard deviations compared to the shear strength of the reference experiments with conventional clinchpoints

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