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Research Papers: JOINING

Mechanism of Hydrojoining and Approach to Increase Torsion Strength of Assembled Camshafts

[+] Author and Article Information
Gang Liu

National Key Laboratory for Precision Hot
Processing of Metals,
Harbin 150001, China;
School of Materials Science and Engineering,
Harbin Institute of Technology,
Harbin 150001, China
e-mail: gliu@hit.edu.cn

Junfeng Lin, Shijian Yuan

National Key Laboratory for Precision Hot
Processing of Metals,
Harbin 150001, China;
School of Materials Science and Engineering,
Harbin Institute of Technology,
Harbin 150001, China

Qiang Liu, Guilin Gao

FAW Car Co. Ltd.,
Changchun 130012, China

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MANUFACTURING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. Manuscript received December 22, 2014; final manuscript received July 13, 2015; published online September 4, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Yannis Korkolis.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 137(5), 051015 (Sep 04, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: MANU-14-1698; doi: 10.1115/1.4031094 History: Received December 22, 2014

Assembled hollow camshaft can be manufactured through hydrojoining process which has the advantages including joining multiple elements onto a tube in once loading, high joining strength, efficiency, and precision. The method of improving joining strength by using cams with noncircular hole was presented. Through numerical simulation and experiment, plastic deformation law of hydrojoining process was studied. The displacement of cam and tube, and the profile dimension change of cam during hydrojoining were obtained. The effect of hole shape of cams on joining strength was analyzed. The assembled hollow camshafts with casting iron cams used for a car engine and those with quenched steel cams for a truck engine were successfully manufactured using hydrojoining technology.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Analytic model of hydrojoining: (a) initial state, (b) contacting state between tube and ring, (c) loading with designated pressure, and (d) after unloading

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Fig. 2

Sectional dimension of cam

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Fig. 3

Finite element model of hydrojoining

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Fig. 4

Curves of stress–strain of cam and tube materials

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Fig. 5

Radial displacement distribution during hydrojoining (mm): (a) σθ/σs  = 0.53, (b) σθ/σs  = 0.86, (c) σθ/σs  = 1.88, and (d) after unloading of internal pressure

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Fig. 6

Radial displacement of cam outer contour: (a) σθ/σs  = 1.88 and (b) after unloading

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Fig. 7

Hoop stress distribution during hydrojoining: (a) σθ/σs  = 1.88 and (b) after unloading

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Fig. 8

Hoop stress of cam inner wall versus circumferential angle

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Fig. 9

Radial stress distribution during hydrojoining: (a) σθ/σs  = 1.88 and (b) after unloading

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Fig. 10

Radial stress of cam inner wall versus circumferential angle

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Fig. 11

Hoop strain versus internal pressure

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Fig. 12

Specimen of hydrojoining cam element

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Fig. 13

Strain of cam outer surface versus internal pressure: (a) δ/Ri=0.008 and (b) different hole offsets

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Fig. 14

Maximum torque versus hole offset

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Fig. 15

Assembled hollow camshaft for truck engine

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