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Research Papers: FORMING

The Effect of Fiber Orientation on the Formability and Failure Behavior of a Woven Self-Reinforced Composite

[+] Author and Article Information
Nima A. Zanjani

Research School of Engineering,
The Australian National University,
31 North Road,
Canberra 2601, Australia
e-mail: nima.akhavan@anu.edu.au

Wentian Wang, Shankar Kalyanasundaram

Research School of Engineering,
The Australian National University,
31 North Road,
Canberra 2601, Australia

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MANUFACTURING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. Manuscript received November 27, 2014; final manuscript received June 18, 2015; published online September 4, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Jingjing Li.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 137(5), 051012 (Sep 04, 2015) (9 pages) Paper No: MANU-14-1634; doi: 10.1115/1.4030894 History: Received November 27, 2014

This article investigates the effect of fiber orientation on forming and failure behaviors of a preconsolidated woven self-reinforced polypropylene (SRPP) composite during the stamp-forming process. Specimens with different aspect ratios were employed to study their formability during forming through a hemispherical punch in an open die configuration. The strain evolution in specimens was captured using a real-time strain measurement system (the aramis). A forming limit diagram (FLD), inspired from metal forming, was constructed to investigate the failure onset in the woven composite. The FLD revealed dominant failure mechanisms in [0 deg,90 deg] specimens were yarn splitting and fiber fracture as depicted by optical microscopy. A modified FLD was proposed to investigate failure mechanisms in [45 deg,−45 deg] samples. It was shown that delamination and intralaminar shear are the main causes of failure in this set of specimens. The outcomes of this study suggest that by changing forming parameters, such as fiber orientation, boundary condition, and aspect ratio, the formability of a preconsolidated SRPP can be improved. These results show the possibility of producing cost-effective, flawless, and fully recyclable products from consolidated woven composites. The proposed criterion can accurately predict failure in a woven composite by considering the combined strain interactions. This is reflected in the implementation of induced deformation modes and strain history into the failure criterion, making it a practical measure for rapid manufacturing techniques, such as stamping. The novel path-dependent failure criterion, introduced in this study, attempts to fill the gap for a reliable and accurate failure measure for woven composites.

Copyright © 2015 by ASME
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Figures

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Fig. 1

Test setup of uniaxial extension of [0 deg,90 deg] and [45 deg,−45 deg] SRPP specimens

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Fig. 2

Geometry of SRPP specimens employed in stretch forming

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Fig. 3

Test setup for stretch forming of SRRP

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Fig. 4

Induced deformation modes in forming

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Fig. 5

Incorporated failure mechanisms in uniaxial extension of [0 deg,90 deg] SRPP specimens

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Fig. 6

Incorporated failure mechanisms in uniaxial extension of [45 deg,−45 deg] SRPP specimens (bias test)

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Fig. 7

Microscopic failure modes during bias extension test (×10)

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Fig. 8

Force–displacement of [0 deg,90 deg] and [45 deg,−45 deg] specimens

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Fig. 9

Strain evolution at pole during stretch forming of SRPP specimens

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Fig. 10

FLD and marginal FLC of [0 deg,90 deg] SRPP specimens prior to rupture

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Fig. 11

Failure in W200-[0 deg,90 deg] SRPP specimen during stamp forming

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Fig. 12

FLC of [45 deg,−45 deg] SRPP specimens

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Fig. 13

Convective coordinate attached to [45 deg,−45 deg] specimens during forming for calculation of strains in the fibers based on incremental deformation

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Fig. 14

Modified FLC for [45 deg,−45 deg] SRPP specimens

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Fig. 15

Failed W25-[45 deg,−45 deg] SRPP specimen during stamp forming

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Fig. 16

Failure in [+45 deg,−45 deg] W75 SRPP specimen during stamp forming

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