0
Research Papers

Analysis of the Efficiency of Hydroerosive Grinding Without Renewal of Abrasive Particles

[+] Author and Article Information
Mario Sergio Della Roverys Coseglio

UTFPR,
Avenida Sete de Setembro, 3165,
Curitiba, Paraná 80230-901, Brazil
e-mail: mariocoseglio@hotmail.com

Pâmela Portela Moreira

UTFPR,
Avenida Sete de Setembro, 3165,
Curitiba, Paraná 80230-901, Brazil
e-mail: pamelaportela@gmail.com

Henrique Leonardo Procópio

UTFPR,
Avenida Sete de Setembro, 3165,
Curitiba, Paraná 80230-901, Brazil
e-mail: henrique_leonardo92@hotmail.com

Giuseppe Pintaude

UTFPR,
Avenida Sete de Setembro, 3165,
Curitiba, Paraná 80230-901, Brazil
e-mail: pintaude@utfpr.edu.br

1Present address: School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK.

2Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MANUFACTURING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. Manuscript received January 30, 2015; final manuscript received July 6, 2015; published online October 1, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Radu Pavel.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 138(3), 031007 (Oct 01, 2015) Paper No: MANU-15-1066; doi: 10.1115/1.4031053 History: Received January 30, 2015; Revised July 06, 2015

Hydroerosive grinding is used as a finishing and inlet rounding operation of diesel nozzles to improve the engine performance. A mixture of hard particles suspended in a carrier fluid circulates through the injection holes to remove material until the required flow condition is achieved, although the time to reach this specification increases with time. The aim of this study is to analyze the process efficiency without renewal of solid particles. Results show that the removal efficiency decreased 20% after 150 hrs and this significant loss can be attributed to hydrodynamic interactions, particle size distribution change, and fluid viscosity reduction.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2016 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Cross section of a diesel injection nozzle

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Schematic diagram of the hydroerosive-grinding unit

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Schematic representation of the geometry of particles from sample P1: (a) particles with dp > 7 μm and (b) particles with dp < 7 μm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Schematic representation of the geometry of particles from sample P5: (a) particles with dp > 7 μm and (b) particles with dp < 7 μm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Mean hydroerosive-grinding time (normalized)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Particle size distribution for samples P0, P5, and PL1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Detail showing impact conditions at the injection hole inlet

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Volume percentage of particles with St ≪ 1, St ≈ 1, and St ≫ 1 for sample FE1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Volume percentage of particles with St ≪ 1, St ≈ 1, and St ≫ 1 for sample P5

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Graphs showing the SPQ and coupling for each of the 40 particles selected from samples FE1 (a) and FE5 (b)

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In