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Research Papers

A New Approach to Blade Design With Constant Rake and Relief Angles for Face-Hobbing of Bevel Gears

[+] Author and Article Information
Mohsen Habibi

Mechanical and Industrial
Engineering Department,
Concordia University,
CAD/CAM Lab. EV 12.165,
1515 Street Catherine Street West,
Montreal, QC H3G 1M8, Canada
e-mail: mohs_hab@encs.concordia.ca

Zezhong Chevy Chen

Mechanical and Industrial
Engineering Department,
Concordia University,
CAD/CAM Lab. EV12.189,
1515 Street Catherine Street West,
Montreal, QC H3G 1M8, Canada
e-mail: zcchen@encs.concordia.ca

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MANUFACTURING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. Manuscript received December 6, 2014; final manuscript received June 12, 2015; published online October 1, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Xiaoping Qian.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 138(3), 031005 (Oct 01, 2015) Paper No: MANU-14-1658; doi: 10.1115/1.4030936 History: Received December 06, 2014; Revised June 12, 2015

Face-hobbing is a productive process to manufacture bevel and hypoid gears. Due to the complexity of face-hobbing, few research works have been conducted on this process. In face-hobbing, the cutting velocity along the cutting edge varies because of the intricate geometry of the cutting system and the machine tool kinematics. Due to the varying cutting velocity and the specific cutting system geometry, working relief and rake angles change along the cutting edge and have large variations at the corner which cause the local tool wear. In this paper, a new method to design cutting blades is proposed by changing the geometry of the rake and relief surfaces to avoid those large variations while the cutting edge is kept unchanged. In the proposed method, the working rake and relief angles are kept constant along the cutting edge by considering the varying cutting velocity and the machine tool kinematics. By applying the proposed method to design the blades, the tool wear characteristics are improved especially at the corner. In addition, in this paper, complete mathematical representations of the cutting system are presented. The working rake and relief angles are measured on the computer-aided design (CAD) model of the proposed and conventional blades and compared with each other. The results show that, unlike the conventional blade, in case of the proposed blade, the working rake and relief angles remain constant along the cutting edge. In addition, in order to validate the better tool wear characteristics of the proposed blade, finite element (FE) machining simulations are conducted on both the proposed and conventional blades. The results show improvements in the tool wear characteristics of the proposed blade in comparison with the conventional one.

Copyright © 2016 by ASME
Topics: Blades , Cutting , Wear
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References

Figures

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Fig. 3

The blade profile sketched on XtZt for the outside blade

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Fig. 1

The cutting system of face-hobbing

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Fig. 4

The illustration of ce, blade angle (αe), and rake angle (ke) in coordinate system Se

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Fig. 6

Gouging between the blade and the cutting surface: (a) gouging accrued and (b) gouging avoided

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Fig. 5

The representation of relief surfaces

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Fig. 10

Five cutting surfaces of the outside blade

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Fig. 11

The cutting surface of the first rotation

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Fig. 12

Velocity direction

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Fig. 9

Formate™ machine tool structure and the workpiece setup

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Fig. 13

Derivation of the working rake (γ) and relief (α) angles

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Fig. 7

The schematic view of the cutter head and the blade orientation

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Fig. 8

The illustration of the transformation from St to Sh

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Fig. 14

The theoretical cutting velocity, Vth

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Fig. 15

The working and theoretical rake angles

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Fig. 16

The working and theoretical relief angles

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Fig. 17

The proposed method to design the rake and relief surfaces by assigning working rake (γ) and relief (α) angles directly

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Fig. 18

Right: the modeled blade using designed rake and relief surfaces and left: the modeled rake and relief surfaces using generating line (Vl)

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Fig. 19

Measuring the working rake (γ) and relief (α) angles at the corner on (a) the conventional blade and (b) the proposed blade

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Fig. 21

FE machining simulations. (a) and (b): Conventional and proposed blade tests modeled in Third Wave®, respectively. (c) and (d): Conventional and proposed blade chip removal simulations in Third Wave®, respectively.

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Fig. 22

Temperature distribution in the conventional (left) and proposed (right) blades

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Fig. 23

Mises stress distribution in the conventional (left) and proposed (right) blades

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Fig. 20

The working rake (γ) and relief (α) angles along the cutting edge for the conventional and proposed blades

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