0
Research Papers

Deposition of a Silicon Carbide Reinforced Metal Matrix Composite (P25) Layer Using CO2 Laser

[+] Author and Article Information
Mum Wai Yip

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment,
Tunku Abdul Rahman University College,
Jalan Genting Kelang, Setapak,
Kuala Lumpur 53300, Malaysia
e-mail: yipmw@acd.tarc.edu.my

Stuart Barnes

Mem. ASME
Warwick Manufacturing Group,
International Manufacturing Centre,
University of Warwick,
Conventry CV4 7AL, UK
e-mail: s.barnes@warwick.ac.uk

Ahmed Aly Diaa Mohmmed Sarhan

Center of Advanced Manufacturing
and Material Processing (AMMP),
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Malaya,
Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia
e-mails: ah_sarhan@um.edu.my; ah_sarhan@yahoo.com

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MANUFACTURING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. Manuscript received June 27, 2014; final manuscript received February 13, 2015; published online March 2, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Z. J. Pei.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 137(3), 031010 (Jun 01, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: MANU-14-1349; doi: 10.1115/1.4029831 History: Received June 27, 2014; Revised February 13, 2015; Online March 02, 2015

The objective of this research was to deposit a silicon carbide (SiC) reinforced layer of P25 (iron-based matrix material) on substrate material surface using CO2 laser. Two experiments using CO2 laser were carried out in this research. In the first experiment set, a gravity feed system was used with one powder feed containing different percentages of SiC particles and iron-based powder. In the second experiment set, preplaced powder was placed on substrate material surface. According to the experimental results, only few SiC particles were found in the clad matrix in the first experiment, and no SiC particles were found in the second experiment. A high microhardness value was noted in the SiC clad (above 1000 HV) in the first experiment compared to the second experiment with hardness values ranging from 200 HV to 700 HV. This was due to the high precipitation of carbide particles in the clad material during the first experiment. A comparison of the two different experiments signifies that the first one was the best because a more uniform layer with less porosity was produced.

Copyright © 2015 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

(a) Experimental setup with powder feed system and (b) experimental setup with preplaced powder

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Porosity of clad layer of sample A1 (100% iron based powder-P25) using laser power 970 W, transverse speed 500 mm/min, and defocus length of 10 mm-X42

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Fine dendrite structure of sample A4 (100% iron based powder-P25) using laser power 970 kW, transverse speed 1000 mm/min, and defocus length of 10 mm-X 668

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Coarse dendrite structure of sample A1 (100% iron based powder-P25) using laser power 970 kW, transverse speed 500 mm/min, and defocus length of 10 mm-X 668

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Martensitic structure on the heat affected zone of sample A4 (100% iron based powder-P25) using laser power 970 W, transverse speed 1000 mm/min, and defocus length 10 mm-X 668

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

SiC particle of sample A5 (10% SiC) using laser power 970 W, transverse speed 500 mm/min, and defocus length of 10 mm-X385

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Microstructure of clad layer of sample A5 (10% SiC) using laser power 970 W, transverse speed 500 mm/min, and defocus length 10 mm-X 668

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Porosity of clad layer of sample A12 (15% SiC) using laser power 970 W, transverse speed 1000 mm/min, and defocus length of 10 mm-X42

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Crack propagated along SiC particle of sample A10 (15% SiC) using laser power 970 W, transverse speed 500 mm/min, and defocus length of 15 mm-X385

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Separation of clad layer of sample A14 (20% SiC) using laser power 970 kW, transverse speed 500 mm/min, and defocus length 15 mm-X42

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Crack propagated along hardness diamond indicator of sample A17 (20% SiC) using laser power 970 kW, transverse speed 1000 mm/min, and defocus length 15 mm-X668

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Hardness of sample A1, A2, A3, and A4 (100% iron base-P25) using laser power 970 W

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Hardness of sample A5, A6, A7, and A8 (10% SiC) using laser power 970 W

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Hardness of sample A9, A10, A11, and A12 (15% SiC) using laser power 970 W

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

Porosity of clad layer of sample B1 using laser power 970 W, transverse speed 500 mm/min, and defocus length of 10 mm-X42

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 16

Porosity in the remains of the clad layer of sample B3 using laser power 970 W, transverse speed of 800 mm/min, and defocus length 15 mm-X 42

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 17

Hardness of samples B1, B2, and B3

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In