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Research Papers

Analytical Modeling of Heat Transfer in Polycrystalline Diamond Compact Cutters in Rock Turning Processes

[+] Author and Article Information
Demeng Che

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Northwestern University,
2145 Sheridan Road,
Evanston, IL 60208
e-mail: dche@u.northwestern.edu

Kornel Ehmann

Fellow ASME
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Northwestern University,
2145 Sheridan Road,
Evanston, IL 60208
e-mail: k-ehmann@northwestern.edu

Jian Cao

Fellow ASME
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Northwestern University,
2145 Sheridan Road,
Evanston, IL 60208
e-mail: jcao@northwestern.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MANUFACTURING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. Manuscript received August 23, 2014; final manuscript received January 14, 2015; published online February 16, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Radu Pavel.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 137(3), 031005 (Jun 01, 2015) (12 pages) Paper No: MANU-14-1444; doi: 10.1115/1.4029653 History: Received August 23, 2014; Revised January 14, 2015; Online February 16, 2015

Heat transfer phenomena at the rock–cutter interface are extremely significant since they affect the polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) cutter's performance in rock cutting/drilling processes. The understanding of how temperature and heat flux responses in the cutter influence the intrinsic mechanisms of the rock–cutter interactions is an essential prerequisite for providing insights to enhance the performance of PDC cutters and to optimize rock cutting/drilling processes. In this paper, a mixed boundary value heat transfer problem was formulated to analytically describe the heat transfer phenomena in the PDC cutters during two-dimensional (2D) orthogonal rock cutting under steady state conditions. An analytical solution in the form of an infinite series was derived based on the method of separation of variables, the use of appropriate simplifications in the formulated problem and the separation of the thermal from the mechanical phenomena. A series of experimental tests were conducted on a newly developed rock cutting testbed to calibrate the process parameters in the analytical solution and then to confirm the validity of the assumed boundary conditions. The comparison between the newly derived analytical solution and the experimental data shows a good match in terms of temperature responses during rock cutting performed by PDC cutters.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Boundary condition assignment on the PDC cutter

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Fig. 2

Rock turning testbed configuration

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Fig. 3

Structural layout of the rock turning testbed

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Fig. 4

Thermocouple attachment locations

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Fig. 5

Photograph of the PDC cutter with thermocouples attached

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Fig. 6

Temperature responses at five thermocouple attachment locations

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Fig. 7

Temperature responses measured by TC-IV in test 1

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Fig. 8

Heat flux along the x direction on boundary BC for different numbers of terms

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Fig. 9

Temperature in the PDC cutter derived by the analytical solution with n = 40

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Fig. 10

Heat flux along x in the PDC cutter derived by the analytical solution with n = 40

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Fig. 11

Heat flux along y in the PDC cutter derived by the analytical solution with n = 40

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Fig. 12

Comparison of absolute temperature responses at the five thermocouple locations

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Fig. 13

Heat generation sources in orthogonal cutting of metal

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