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Technical Brief

Experimental Investigation of Microcutting Mechanisms in Oxide Ceramic CM332 Grinding

[+] Author and Article Information
G. Mladenovic

Production Engineering Department,
Faculty of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Belgrade,
Kraljice Marije 16,
Belgrade 11120, Serbia
e-mail: gmladenovic@mas.bg.ac.rs

P. Bojanic

Professor
Production Engineering Department,
Faculty of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Belgrade,
Kraljice Marije 16,
Belgrade 11120, Serbia
e-mail: pbojanic@mas.bg.ac.rs

Lj. Tanovic

Professor
Production Engineering Department,
Faculty of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Belgrade,
Kraljice Marije 16,
Belgrade 11120, Serbia
e-mail: ltanovic@mas.bg.ac.rs

S. Klimenko

Professor
V. Bakul Institute for Superhard Materials of the National
Academy of Sciences of Ukraine,
Avtozavodskaya 2,
Kiev 04074, Ukraine
e-mail: atmu@meta.ua

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MANUFACTURING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. Manuscript received December 28, 2011; final manuscript received January 5, 2015; published online February 24, 2015. Editor: Y. Lawrence Yao.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 137(3), 034502 (Jun 01, 2015) (5 pages) Paper No: MANU-11-1416; doi: 10.1115/1.4029564 History: Received December 28, 2011; Revised January 05, 2015; Online February 24, 2015

The paper contains an experimental study of microcutting intended to help the optimization of the grinding process of the oxide ceramic CM332 (99.5% Al2O3) grinding. The need for investigating the mechanisms occurring between the abrasive material and the ceramic is imposed by the fact that grinding is the dominant technology used to achieve the required quality of the workpiece surface finish. The microcutting process was performed with a single diamond cone-shaped grain of tip radius of 0.2 mm at varying depths of cut. The investigations were carried out to determine the normal and tangential cutting forces, the critical penetration depth and the specific grinding energy as a function of the grain penetration speed and depth. The critical grain penetration depth separating ductile flow from brittle fracture falls within the 4–6 μm range. The values of the critical penetration depth are also consistent with the results of changes in the cutting forces and the specific grinding energy. The chip formation mechanism is associated with the presence of median/radial and lateral cracks, ductile flow, chipping along the groove, and crushing beneath the diamond grain, all this affecting the quality of the ceramic's machined surface.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic illustration of crack system produced by Vickers and Knoop indentation

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Fig. 2

Indentation of brittle materials: formation of the large-strain zone

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Fig. 8

Radial cracks and ceramics fragment immediately before detachment

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Fig. 7

SEM micrographs showing the presence of intergranular and transgranular cracks

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Fig. 6

SEM micrographs showing the presence of pores and voids

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Fig. 5

Illustration of the chip formation process during the indenter's motion

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Fig. 4

Experimental setup for normal and tangential force measurements

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Fig. 3

Schematic illustration of the microcutting process with the diamond grain's motion

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Fig. 11

Specific grinding energy as a function of the cut chip's cross-sectional area

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Fig. 10

Change in normal and tangential forces as a function of grain penetration depth: (a) VS = 15 m/s and (b) VS = 25 m/s

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Fig. 9

Adjacent traces of microcutting

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