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Research Papers

A Predictive Model for Temperature Rise of Spindle–Bearing Integrated System

[+] Author and Article Information
Xiaolei Deng

College of Mechanical Engineering,
Quzhou University,
Quzhou 324000, China;
State Key Lab of Fluid Power
and Mechatronic Systems,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Zhejiang University,
Hangzhou 310027, China
e-mail: dxl@zju.edu.cn

Jianzhong Fu

State Key Lab of Fluid Power
and Mechatronic Systems,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Zhejiang University,
Hangzhou 310027, China

Yuwen Zhang

Fellow ASME
Department of Mechanical
and Aerospace Engineering,
University of Missouri,
Columbia, MO 65211

1This work was completed during the first author's visiting appointment at Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MANUFACTURING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. Manuscript received January 3, 2014; final manuscript received December 17, 2014; published online January 20, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Allen Y. Yi.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 137(2), 021014 (Apr 01, 2015) (10 pages) Paper No: MANU-14-1007; doi: 10.1115/1.4029445 History: Received January 03, 2014; Revised December 17, 2014; Online January 20, 2015

In order to obtain the thermal characteristics of the spindle–bearing integrated system of the computer numerical control (CNC) machine tools effectively, a mathematical model is established by employing the heat source method (HSM). The thermal characteristics of spindle–bearing system are identified by using the derived mathematical formula, and the presented model is validated by the finite element method (FEM) under four types of conditions corresponding to different heat intensities, heat transfer coefficients, geometrical model sizes, and heat source positions. Compared with the FEM, the presented model has better computational efficiency. The temperature fields of the two spindle systems of a CNC machine tool are predicted by using the present model. The predicted temperature field is compared with the measured data and results show that the maximum relative errors for the two systems are 0.41% and 8.38%, respectively. The proposed model has a potential to be applied in calculating temperature field and thermal deformation or other related engineering area.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Temperature field boundary treatment of spindle–bearing integrated system: (1) real heat source; (2) cylindrical surface; and (3) image heat source. (a) 3D CAD structure model. (b) 2D CAD structure model with heat sources, boundaries, and dimensions.

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Fig. 2

Coordinate diagram of instantaneous finite LHS temperature field

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Fig. 3

Coordinate diagram of instantaneous finite large CSHS temperature field

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Fig. 4

The temperature rise history of a certain point A in the conductor

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Fig. 5

Comparison of results with the same geometry model size under different conditions (the inset figures are temperature distribution contours of FE model: temperature at t = 9000 s). (a) H = 50 W, hc = 35 W/m2 °C. (b) H = 80 W, hc = 35 W/m2 °C. (c) H = 50 W, hc = 25 W/m2 °C.

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Fig. 6

Comparison of results with the different geometry model size: H = 37.765 W, hc = 33 W/m2 °C (the inset figures are temperature distribution contours of FE model: temperature at t = 9000 s.)

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Fig. 7

The sensors layout chart of measure points (left: a machine tool with eight temperature sensors configuration; middle: spindle–bearing system CAD model; and right: eight temperature sensors in CAD model).

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Fig. 8

Experiment results of eight temperature sensors

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Fig. 9

Comparison of mathematical, experimental, and FEM results (the inset figures are temperature distribution contours of FE model: temperature at thermal equilibrium state). (a) C1 Sensit result. (b) C2 Sensit result.

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Fig. 10

Deformation of spindle in the axis of spindle

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Fig. 11

Thermal error experiment setup. (a) Accessorial plane substitute. (b) Installation of noncontact laser sensor.

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Fig. 12

Thermal deformation history curves of spindle in the axis direction

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