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Technical Brief

Electric Field-Assisted Additive Manufacturing Polyaniline Based Composites for Thermoelectric Energy Conversion

[+] Author and Article Information
Bruce Y. Decker

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
College of Engineering,
California State Polytechnic University,
Pomona, 3801 West Temple Avenue,
Pomona, CA 91768
e-mail: bydecker@cpp.edu

Yong X. Gan

Mem. ASME
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
College of Engineering,
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona,
3801 West Temple Avenue,
Pomona, CA 91768
e-mail: yxgan@cpp.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MANUFACTURING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. Manuscript received March 28, 2014; final manuscript received December 10, 2014; published online January 20, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Joseph Beaman.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 137(2), 024504 (Apr 01, 2015) (3 pages) Paper No: MANU-14-1136; doi: 10.1115/1.4029398 History: Received March 28, 2014; Revised December 10, 2014; Online January 20, 2015

Polyaniline (PANi) based composites were made by electric force assisted nanocasting. The PANi matrix was mixed with thermoelectric Bi–Te alloy nanoparticles. The uniform dispersion of the nanoparticles in the polymer was achieved via electric field assisted casting. The nanoparticles can enhance the thermoelectricity, specifically increase the Seebeck coefficient. Structure analysis and Seebeck effect experiments were performed. The microstructure of the composite materials was studied by the use of electron microscopy. The preliminary results show that the nanocomposites are n-type with an average Seebeck value of 30 μV/K. The electrical resistance of the composites is about 35 MΩ.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Electric force assisted nanocasting experimental setup and the working principle. (a) Nanocasting unit on a rotating platform and (b) nanocasting under external forces.

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Fig. 2

Images of PANi nanofibers on titanium dioxide nanotubes. (a) SEM and (b) TEM.

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Fig. 3

(a) TEM image of a Bi–Te/Ni shell-core nanoparticle cluster generated by Galvanic displacement, (b) Bi–Te/Ni in aniline solution, and (c) SEM image of titanium dioxide nanotubes

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Fig. 4

The absolute value of the Seebeck coefficient for the PANi composite material

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