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Research Papers

Additive Manufacturing of Glass

[+] Author and Article Information
Junjie Luo

Mem. ASME
Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
Missouri University of Science and Technology,
400 W. 13th Street,
Rolla, MO 65401
e-mail: ljwtb@mst.edu

Heng Pan

Mem. ASME
Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
Missouri University of Science and Technology,
400 W. 13th Street,
Rolla, MO 65401
e-mail: hp5c7@mst.edu

Edward C. Kinzel

Mem. ASME
Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
Missouri University of Science and Technology,
400 W. 13th Street,
Rolla, MO 65401
e-mail: kinzele@mst.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MANUFACTURING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. Manuscript received April 22, 2014; final manuscript received September 3, 2014; published online October 24, 2014. Assoc. Editor: David L. Bourell.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 136(6), 061024 (Oct 24, 2014) (6 pages) Paper No: MANU-14-1247; doi: 10.1115/1.4028531 History: Received April 22, 2014; Revised September 03, 2014

Selective laser melting (SLM) is a technique for the additive manufacturing (AM) of metals, plastics, and even ceramics. This paper explores using SLM for depositing glass structures. A CO2 laser is used to locally melt portions of a powder bed to study the effects of process parameters on stationary particle formation as well as continuous line quality. Numerical modeling is also applied to gain insight into the physical process. The experimental and numerical results indicate that the absorptivity of the glass powder is nearly constant with respect to the processing parameters. These results are used to deposit layered single-track wide walls to demonstrate the potential of using the SLM process for building transparent parts. Finally, the powder bed process is compared to a wire-fed approach. AM of glass is relevant for gradient index optics, systems with embedded optics, and the formation of hermetic seals.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Illustration of powder bed SLM setup

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Fig. 2

Experimental results showing particle diameter as a function of exposure duration and laser power. The image in the inset shows the result for P = 10 W and τ = 1 s.

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Fig. 3

Particle diameter as a function of exposure duration and laser power from simulation

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Fig. 4

Shape distribution of tracks: (a) beam size 70 μm; (b) beam size 200 μm; (c) beam size 350 μm; and (d) photographs of different track regimes

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Fig. 5

Continuous line width distribution. White, gray, and black correspond to a beam sizes of 70 μm, 200 μm, and 350 μm, respectively.

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Fig. 6

Simulated results of single track scanning showing with inset showing temperature distribution in the powder bed

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Fig. 7

Wall built using powder bed process (a) 1 mm layer thickness, (b) 0.5 mm layer thickness, and (c) side view of 0.5 mm parts. Photographs are as deposited while insets show a portion of the same parts after cutting and polishing. The arrows indicate the build direction.

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Fig. 8

(a) Illustration of wire-fed process and photographs of part, (b) as deposited, and (c) after cutting and polishing

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Fig. 9

Micrographs of polished surfaces (a) powder bed part shown with 1 mm layer thickness and (b) wire fed part

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