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Research Papers

Cutting Tool Life Analysis in Heat-Pipe Assisted Drilling Operations

[+] Author and Article Information
Lin Zhu

Mechanical Engineering Department,
Anhui Agricultural University,
Hefei 230036, China
Mechanical Engineering Department,
University of Wisconsin,
Milwaukee, WI 53211
e-mail: zl009@mail.ustc.edu.cn

Tien-Chien Jen

ASME Fellow
Mechanical Engineering Department,
University of Wisconsin,
Milwaukee, WI 53211
e-mail: Jent@uwm.edu

Yong-Bing Liu, Jie-Wen Zhao

Mechanical Engineering Department,
Anhui University,
Hefei 230601, China

Wei-Lai Liu

Department of Precision
Machinery and Instrumentation,
University of Science and Technology of China,
Hefei 230026, China
e-mail: weilai@ustc.edu.cn

Yi-Hsin Yen

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee,
Milwaukee, WI 53211
e-mail: Yi-Hsin@uwm.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MANUFACTURING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. Manuscript received November 20, 2013; final manuscript received May 22, 2014; published online November 26, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Burak Ozdoganlar.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 137(1), 011008 (Feb 01, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: MANU-13-1409; doi: 10.1115/1.4028481 History: Received November 20, 2013; Revised May 22, 2014; Online November 26, 2014

This paper further focuses on the feasibility and effectiveness of heat-pipe cooling in drilling operations based on our previously related work. To achieve this, the authors used a combination of numerical analyses and experimental measurements for drilling in three different cooling conditions, i.e., dry drilling, fluid cooling, and heat-pipe cooling. The evidences obtained from the experimental study and finite element analyses were compared. The results strongly demonstrate that heat-pipe assisted cooling in drilling processes can effectively perform thermal management comparable to the fluid cooling used pervasively in the manufacturing industry, consequently offering the tool life extension.

Copyright © 2015 by ASME
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References

Johnson, D., 1996, “Why Cutting Tools Fail,” Tooling & Production, Huebcore Communications, Inc., Solon, OH.
Trent, E., and Wright, P., 2000, Metal Cutting, Butterworth/Heinemann, Oxford, UK.
Stephenson, D. A., and Agapiou, J. S., 2006, Metal Cutting Theory and Practice, CRC Taylor & Francis, Boca Raton, FL.
Jen, T. C., Chen, Y. M., and Gutierrez, G., 2002, “Investigation of Heat Pipe Cooling in Drilling Applications. Part I: Preliminary Numerical Analysis and Verification,” Int. J. Mach. Tools Manuf., 42(5), pp. 643–652. [CrossRef]
Jen, T. C., Gutierrez, G., and Jadhav, R., 2002, Progress Report for the Heat Pipe Drill Temperatures Simulations and Experimental Measurement, Lamb Technicon Machining Systems, Warren, MI.
Ding, Y., and Hong, S. Y., 1998, “Improvement of Chip Breaking in Machining Low Carbon Steel by Cryogenically Pre-Cooling the Workpiece,” ASME J. Manuf. Sci. Eng., 120(1), pp. 76–83. [CrossRef]
Chiou, R. Y., Lu, L., and Chen, J. S.-J., 2007, “Investigation of Dry Machining With Embedded Heat Pipe Cooling by Finite Element Analysis and Experiments,” Int. J. Adv. Manuf. Technol., 31(9–10), pp. 905–914. [CrossRef]
Labataille, J., and Manjunathaiah, J., 1999, “Evaluation of Drilling With Heat Pipe Cooling,” Lamb Technicon Machining Systems, Internal Report No. Lx-0437.
Gutierrez, G., 2002, “Investigation of Heat Pipes for Drilling Applications,” Ph.D. thesis, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI.
Peterson, G. P., 1994, An Introduction to Heat Pipes: Modeling, Testing, and Applications, Wiley, New York.
Jen, T. C., and Jadhav, R., 2003, “Thermal Management of a Heat-Pipe Drill—A FEM Analysis,” ASME Paper No. HT2003-47145 [CrossRef].
Judd, R. L., MacKenzie, H. S., and Elbestawi, M. A., 1995, “An Investigation of a Heat Pipe Cooling System for Use Turning on a Lathe,” Int. J. Adv. Manuf. Technol., 10(6), pp. 357–366. [CrossRef]
Chiou, R. Y., Chen, J. S. J., Lin, L., and Cole, L., 2002, “Prediction of Heat Transfer Behavior of Carbide Inserts With Embedded Heat Pipes for Dry Machining,” ASME Paper No. IMECE2002-32656 [CrossRef].
Chiou, R. Y., Chen, J. S. J., Lin, L., and North, M. T., 2004, “The Effect of an Embedded Heat Pipe in a Cutting Tool on Temperature and Wear,” Proc. SPIE, 154, pp. 93–95.
Li, R., and Shih, A. J., 2007, “Spiral Point Drill Temperature and Stress in High-Throughput Drilling of Titanium,” Int. J. Mach. Tools Manuf., 47(12–13), pp. 2006–2017. [CrossRef]
Incropera, F. P., and DeWitt, D. P., 1996, Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer, Wiley, New York.
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Mills, B., Mottishaw, T., and Chisholm, A., 1981, “The Application of Scanning Electronic Microscopy to the Study of Temperatures and Temperature Distribution in M2 High Speed Steel Twist Drills,” CIRP Ann., 30(1), pp. 15–27. [CrossRef]

Figures

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Fig. 1

Location of the heat pipe inside in the drill

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Fig. 2

Schematic of a heat pipe

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Fig. 3

Typical twist drill design

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Fig. 4

Drills (a) without and (b) with a heat pipe

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Fig. 5

Parabolic solid element

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Fig. 6

(a) Drill tip and (b) loaded drill

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Fig. 7

Physical configuration of an idealized drill with a heat pipe [4]

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Fig. 8

(a) Temperature distribution on the tool in dry drilling and (b) detailed A of Fig. 8(a). Magnified view of the temperature distribution on the tool tip and (c) displacements at the drill tip due to the temperature

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Fig. 9

Temperature distributions on the tools in (a) fluid cooling and (b) heat-pipe cooling

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Fig. 10

Thermal stress distributions on the tools in (a) dry drilling, (b) fluid cooling, and (c) heat-pipe cooling

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Fig. 11

Heat-pipe drill fabrication

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Fig. 12

Solid drill and heat-pipe drill

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Fig. 13

(a) Drilling operations on the work-piece material and (b) data measure equipment used in the experiments

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Fig. 14

Schematic sketch of the drilling operations

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Fig. 15

Hole-drilling pattern for each cast iron block

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Fig. 16

Temperature trend versus number of holes, block #1

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Fig. 17

Temperature trend versus number of holes, block #2

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Fig. 18

Temperature trend versus number of holes, block #3

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Fig. 19

Temperature trend versus time, all blocks

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Fig. 20

Maximum flank wear after each block of drilling

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Fig. 21

Flank wears of the tools in dry drilling

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Fig. 22

Flank wears of the tools in fluid cooling

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Fig. 23

Flank wears of the tools in heat-pipe cooling

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Fig. 24

Comparison of tool lives under various drilling conditions

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Fig. 25

Comparisons of tool lives and temperatures drill under various drilling conditions

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