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Research Papers

Multiple-Material Topology Optimization of Compliant Mechanisms Created Via PolyJet Three-Dimensional Printing

[+] Author and Article Information
Andrew T. Gaynor

Topology Optimization Group,
Civil Engineering Department,
Johns Hopkins University,
3400 N. Charles Street,
Baltimore, MD 21218
e-mail: agaynor1@jhu.edu

Nicholas A. Meisel

Design, Research, and Education for Additive
Manufacturing Systems Laboratory,
Virginia Tech,
Randolph Hall,
460 Old Turner Street,
Blacksburg, VA 24061
e-mail: meiselna@vt.edu

Christopher B. Williams

Mem. ASME
Design, Research, and Education for
Additive Manufacturing Systems Laboratory,
Virginia Tech,
Randolph Hall,
460 Old Turner Street,
Blacksburg, VA 24061
e-mail: cbwill@vt.edu

James K. Guest

Mem. ASME
Topology Optimization Group,
Civil Engineering Department,
Johns Hopkins University,
3400 N. Charles Street,
Baltimore, MD 21218
e-mail: jkguest@jhu.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MANUFACTURING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. Manuscript received April 15, 2014; final manuscript received August 17, 2014; published online October 24, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Joseph Beaman.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 136(6), 061015 (Oct 24, 2014) (10 pages) Paper No: MANU-14-1210; doi: 10.1115/1.4028439 History: Received April 15, 2014; Revised August 17, 2014

Compliant mechanisms are able to transfer motion, force, and energy using a monolithic structure without discrete hinge elements. The geometric design freedoms and multimaterial capability offered by the PolyJet 3D printing process enables the fabrication of compliant mechanisms with optimized topology. The inclusion of multiple materials in the topology optimization process has the potential to eliminate the narrow, weak, hingelike sections that are often present in single-material compliant mechanisms and also allow for greater magnitude deflections. In this paper, the authors propose a design and fabrication process for the realization of 3-phase, multiple-material compliant mechanisms. The process is tested on a 2D compliant force inverter. Experimental and numerical performance of the resulting 3-phase inverter is compared against a standard 2-phase design.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Representation of direct 3D PolyJet printing process

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Fig. 2

General compliant mechanism design decision tree

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Fig. 3

Chosen compliant mechanism design approach (dashed/red)

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Fig. 4

Design domain and loading for inverter case study

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Fig. 5

2-phase (solid-void) inverter result found using the robust SIMP approach

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Fig. 6

3-phase inverter result found using the robust combinatorial SIMP approach (2:1 stiffness ratio)

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Fig. 7

3-phase inverter result found using the robust, multiphase SIMP approach

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Fig. 8

Compliant specimens with load and cantilever attachments

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Fig. 9

Deflection of (a) 2-phase inverter (Fig. 5), (b) 3-phase combinatorial SIMP inverter (Fig. 6), and (c) 3-phase multiphase SIMP inverter (Fig. 7) (all under 9.65 kg applied load)

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Fig. 10

3-phase inverter result found using robust, multiphase SIMP approach (20:1 stiffness ratio)

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Fig. 11

Deflection of 3-phase inverter with TangoBlack+ material (under 2.75 kg of applied load)

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